A National Award-Winning Publication

Luis Gutiérrez:  No buscaré una re-elección

El sorpresivo anuncio del congresista federal Luis Gutiérrez de no buscar su reelección para un nuevo mandato,  levantó una serie de especulaciones sobre lo que podría haber detrás de su decisión.

 Al explicar sus motivos en conferencia de prensa, el político puertorriqueño dijo que quería estar más tiempo con su familia después de pasar “más de 4000 noches” fuera de su casa en sus 25 años de carrera.

  “Quiero escribir el último capítulo de mi vida con Jessica, con Zoraida, con mi familia”, afirmó.

  El anuncio tuvo lugar cuando Gutiérrez goza de una popularidad a nivel nacional por su feroz defensa a favor de los inmigrantes indocumentados, su enfrentamiento al presidente Donald Trump por su postura en este tema y su crítica a la situación de Puerto Rico, aún devastado por el huracán Maria.  

  “Luis es el rostro más visible de nuestra lucha por una reforma migratoria y para ayudar a los Dreamers”, dijo Rigoberto López, un inmigrante mexicano.

   Según el congresista otro de los  motivos que lo llevaron a tomar “un nuevo rumbo en su vida” es el haber encontrado a su sucesor: el comisionado del Condado de Cook Jesús “Chuy” García, un ex rival del alcalde Rahm Emanuel en la pasada elecciones municipales.

En las pasadas elecciones para la alcaldía, García fue un duro rival del alcalde Rahm Emanuel, quien recibió un total apoyo de Gutierrez.

Gutiérrez, quien fue taxista, y “Chuy” Garcia crecieron políticamente a la sombra de Harold Washington, el primer alcalde afroamericano de Chicago.

Ante la insistencia de la prensa para que hablara de su futuro, el político de 63 años dejó en claro que continuará su lucha por los dreamers y por reconstruir su natal Puerto Rico.

 Dijo además que se unirá a grupos de inmigrantes para construir “una infraestructura que asegure que estemos listos para ganar (las elecciones) en el 2020.

 Tras la conferencia de prensa, levantó una ola de especulaciones sobre el futuro del congresista, entre ellos el Suntime, que se preparaba para ser presidente.

 

The power of Adela Ortega

 English version –

Adela Ortega has much in common with the very locomotives that she rebuilds. She is a determined woman who pushes life’s train along, overcoming all obstacles on the track to success.

When she founded Professional Locomotive Services, Inc. (PLS) in Illinois in 1996, a now decade-old company based in East Chicago, Indiana, her business path  had not been all that smooth.

It was a rough world, of men galvanized like iron rails, and she  had barely $ 20,000 of capital that she took from her retirement fund 401k — and a newborn baby.

“It was difficult. During the first year I brought the baby with me to feed him, but I also had to do many other things at the same time, “she recalls.

It ws so that this woman began to operate the PLS enterprise wearing many hats: She was the engineer, salesperson, lead administrative lead, marketing point person, accountant, strategist and, soon, a single mother.

The challenge of starting her own business and the joy of being a mother combined to impact her character.

The idea of starting a locomotive company didn’t occur to Adela by accident. While attending DePaul University, where she graduated with degrees in business administration and accounting, she had the opportunity to study law and travel to Europe to take courses in finances, marketing and management. All this would prepare her for her future.

LOCOMOTIVE BEGINNINGS

At the beginning of her divorce, she left a comfortable job in downtown Chicago and moved to Naperville where she was hired by a company in the railroad industry.

“The company leased railway cars to Mexican companies such as Cementos Mexicanos (Cemex). Then I started selling locomotive batteries and one day my boss offered [me an opportunity] to sell locomotives. My heart beat loudly! I could not sell something I did not know, “she confesses.

It was then that Adela began to enter this world. First, understanding the market, who purchased them, who sells them. She spent hours and hours learning the business, researching without pause and without the resources of the Internet today. The day she physically met an iron monster, she fell to her feet.

“It was like a love at first sight. I remember the moment they opened the door of a locomotive and I heard the sound of the engine. At that moment I began to see my future. I said: I have to [make one of these, “she smiles.

WHEN ONE DOOR CLOSES, ANOTHER OPENS

Three years later, when the passion of the locomotive was already running through its veins, the Naperville company got rid of the locomotive sales department and Adela.

She soon discovered an opportunity to start her own company, tapping into her customer rolodex  and industry insights.

That preparation and her connections were key to getting ahead. She herself is still surprised by the early results of a company that started with a mechanic, an electrician and a single customer.

“In the first year [we grew]more than I expected. The $20,000 became more than $400,000 by the end of the year, “she says. “And I took that money to reinvest it, employing more people. ”

Today PLS employs 22 workers, previously having reached 30 employees, and generates approximately $5 million in annual sales.

But perhaps the key to the success of this member of a family of nine siblings should be sought in her small town of Durango where from a very young age, her mother gave her responsibilities that made her mature early.

“I was born in an adobe house, only two rooms. For the first nine years I lived there. I do not remember my father. He lived in the United States and sent money to my mother.”

There is sweet melancholy in  little details of her memories: “In those years I was happy. I enjoyed school, nature, rain.”

Then came a decision to reunite with her father, which she recalls with a mixture of sadness and humor: “My mother was 25 years old. We were   seven siblings. We passed the border with gifts in hand and told the immigration officer that we were going to a party … Four decades later, the party’s not over yet, “she smiles.

She arrived in Chicago on September, and soon the biting cold, the leafless green trees, weighed on her spirits.

She missed her native land in Durango. As a child, she asked her parents when they would return and was told, “Never again …”

Adela then took refuge in her studies. Her commitment resulted in good grades and she was able to enroll at the University of Illinois in Chicago, then attend DePaul University, all to one day set up a company that rebuilds locomotives, repairs them and maintains them wherever they are in the country.

Now she has the luxury of dreaming big: “My dream is to make new locomotives, design and sell them. I’ve been able to join investors, but I feel prepared, able to do it on my own. ”

And when asked what the locomotive represents for her, she doesn’t hesitate an instant in her response. “Power.” It’s a word that sums up what it’s like to be in Adela’s shoes.

She is a woman who is driven not by money, but opportunity. A Latina determined to meet her destiny and then some.

By Clemente Nicado, Editor in Chief – English version: Arianna Hermosillo)

Dr. Juan Andrade Jr. to receive Lifetime Achievement Award

Dr. Juan Andrade Jr., one of the most highly decorated Latino leaders in the nation, will receive the Lifetime Achievement Award during Negocios Now Gala, on July 14, at the Hyatt Regency Chicago.
Juan is only the fourth Latino in history to be honored by both the government of the United States and the government of Mexico. In 2001, he received the Presidential Citizens Medal from President Bill Clinton for “the performance of exemplary deeds of service for the nation” and “for extraordinary accomplishments in promoting civic participation and leadership development.”

In 2011 he received the National Ohtli Award, the highest honor presented by the people and government of Mexico for distinguished service to the Mexican and Mexican American community in the United States.

He has earned more degrees than any leader of a major national organization, including a bachelor’s, a master’s in education, a specialist in education, a doctorate in education and a post-doctorate master’s degree. He also has five honorary doctorates and has been recognized as a distinguished alumnus by Howard Payne University, Northern Illinois University, and Loyola University Chicago.
After 18 years in farm work, Mr. Andrade rose to become a venerated community leader, co-founding USHLI, which he leads today, working to maximize the awareness, engagement and participation of Latinos in civic life. USHLI has registered 2.2 million voters, published 425 studies on Latino demographics, trained over 500,000 present/future leaders, awarded over $1.3 million in scholarships and internships, and sponsors the largest Latino leadership conference in the nation.

Rulis Trucking helps get food from farm to table

Raúl Rosas Bravo has spent more than a million miles on the road in nearly two decades of driving –

By Tara García Mathewson

How often do you think about the distance food travels before ending up in your supermarket? Raúl Rosas Bravo has made it his job to think about that. He spends the bulk of his days on the highway, driving refrigerated trucks carrying milk, beef, pork and chicken between the Midwest and New York and Ohio, mostly.

Over the last 20 years, Rosas Bravo has spent countless hours on the road, traveling more than a million miles shuttling his edible cargo as part of the nation’s vast trucking industry. Sometimes he’s gone for two days, sometimes four or five. When he used to drive to and from California, he would be gone two weeks at a time.

Rosas Bravo owns and operates Rulis Trucking, a family business he founded in 2002 and has steered through the highs and lows of the economy since then. He and his wife have eight children, ranging in age from 9 years old to 28. The oldest has an accounting degree and has brought those skills back to the business, improving record-keeping and operations. When his daughter was in college, she too worked at Rulis, arranging routes and helping with invoices.

“All the kids say they’re part of Rulis,” Rosas Bravo said. “They don’t work for us, officially, but they’re key pieces. My wife, too. When we started it was the two of us doing everything by hand.”

The kids, much more comfortable with technology than their parents, have brought a new level of efficiency to the business. And after years of thinking about the company as a way to maintain the family, Rosas Bravo is talking about expansion. His family is more experienced now; they can create better systems and set the company up to grow.

Already he has drivers he can call on to take over for him when he wants a break. If he wants to take a week off and spend it with his family, he can.

“It’s a beautiful thing,” Rosas Bravo said. “To be able to control your own schedule.”

Rosas Bravo arrived in the United States from Puebla, Mexico on May 1, 1985. He was barely 19, with big plans to work for a year, make a lot of money and return home. Like many other immigrants, he found himself working to pay off debts that first year, and when he met his wife and started having kids, his priorities changed. He still hasn’t moved back to Puebla, and he has long stopped thinking he will anytime soon.

When Rosas Bravo first came to the United States he worked in California agriculture, which gave him a first-hand look at the massive trucking business intertwined with it. He started driving at night after working in the fields during the day, getting more deeply involved in the trucking side of things as the years went on.

He moved to Illinois with his wife and growing family almost 20 years ago, officially starting his business as a full-time enterprise soon after. Rulis has five trucks, and the bulk of the business is in transporting food that needs to be kept cold. Early on, Rosas Bravo focused on transporting vegetables, and now he moves mostly meat and milk.

“It’s a difficult business,” Rosas Bravo said, “like all other businesses. We have highs and lows. We’ve had good times and also bad times.”

Rulis Trucking is particularly affected by the cost of diesel. When the price goes up, Rosas Bravo feels it immediately. Diesel prices steadily increased from the time he founded Rulis Trucking to the economic crash in 2008 and a prolonged period of pricey diesel lasted from 2011 to 2014, according to historical data.

Rosas Bravo said things have gotten better since then. And his family business continues to allow him to provide for his family, contribute to his savings and invest.

One day he does think he’ll go back to Puebla — perhaps in retirement. He hopes he’ll have the flexibility to come and go freely, though. Winters in Puebla, avoiding Chicago’s cold, and summers with his children, in his adoptive, Midwestern home.

Abogada Carlina Tapia Ruano: La Supercarlina

La abogada Carlina Tapia-Ruano encontró en los inmigrantes su llamado como abogada

 

Por Michele Agudelo (Columbia College)

“Aprendí a no dejar que las palabras de los demás afectaran mi trabajo; muchas veces quería contestarles pero simplemente dejé que mi trabajo hablara por sí mismo”, confesó Carlina Tapia-Ruano.

A sus 61 años y con 36 años ejerciendo como abogada de inmigración, Tapia-Ruano es una mujer con mucha vitalidad quien ha enfrentado una vida llena de desafíos. Pero a la vez, su reconocida trayectoria la ha llevado a ser una de las más prestigiosas abogadas de inmigración no sólo en Chicago, sino en los Estados Unidos.

Sus comienzos fueron difíciles. A la edad de 5 años, en 1960, ella y su familia emigraron como refugiados cubanos a este país.

Escapando de la inestabilidad y de la violencia que se había generado en la isla por el régimen comunista, su familia emigró en busca de mejores oportunidades, dice la abogada.

Llegaron a Holland, Michigan, donde su padre consiguió un trabajo como pastor en una iglesia holandesa cristiana reformada. El decidió ser pastor protestante. La población donde vivieron tenía más de 75% de residentes de ascendencia holandesa, blanca y de ojos azules.

“Crecí pensando que la mayoría de las personas lucían como ellos y que yo era diferente porque tenía el cabello y los ojos oscuros “, dijo Tapia-Ruano.

Cuando era ella adolescente su padre tuvo una oportunidad de trabajo en Illinois y la familia se mudó a Chicago. Ahí se dio cuenta que ella no era muy diferente a la gente que vivía aquí y que había una gran población latina lo que la hizo sentirse más segura.

“Mi familia y yo vivimos la mayor parte de nuestras vida bajo el nivel de pobreza,” comentó Tapia-Ruano.

 

Aunque tenían limitaciones financieras, los padres de Tapia-Ruano le inculcaron desde muy temprana edad la importancia de estudiar.  Ellos hicieron el sacrificio para que ella y su hermana atendieran escuelas privadas.

 

“Ya estábamos en deudas desde mucho antes de comenzar la universidad”, comentó Ruano. En el año 1973, con la ayuda de préstamos estudiantiles y becas Ruano pudo realizar sus estudios en leyes en la Illinois Wesleyan University. Allí notó que pertenecía a una minoría en sus clases, no solamente como mujer sino como mujer latina.

 

“La mayoría de los estudiantes en mis clases eran hombres jóvenes, inmaduros y arrogantes que ingresaron a la universidad después de haber completado su escuela secundaria”, recordó Tapia-Ruano.

 

Para ella fue un ambiente muy incómodo porque no encontraba nada en común con sus compañeros. En ese momento decidió unirse al Latino Hispanic Bar Association y aunque había muy pocos en el grupo eran personas que compartían las mismas experiencias que ella.

 

En los últimos dos años de universidad Tapia-Ruano decidió tomar algunos trabajos de medio tiempo. “Trabajé en diez diferentes bufetes de abogados y me di cuenta que no me gustó para nada el ser abogada”, expresó Tapia-Ruano.

 

Ella se sintió entre la espada y la pared porque no sabía cómo explicarles a sus padres que ya no le interesaba ejercer una carrera de leyes, después de ponerlos en deuda. Sin embargo, en su último año tuvo la oportunidad de trabajar para un bufete que se especializaba en inmigración.

 

“En ese momento sentí que encontré lo que andaba buscando y que me llenaba como persona y profesional. Me día cuenta que en esto quería trabajar y que quería abrir mi propio bufete”, dijo Tapia-Ruano.

 

Se identificó mucho en ser abogada de inmigración porque “nunca estoy lastimando a otras personas y siento que estoy en el lado justo de la ley en ayudar a mejorar la vida de los demás y en entender su situación ya que yo también soy una inmigrante”, dijo Tapia-Ruano.

 

Pero allí no concluye la historia. Como profesional, el hecho de ser mujer ha presentado sus desafíos. Hubo casos en los que ella entraba a la sala del tribunal con un cliente hombre, y el juez pensaba que ella era la clienta en vez de la abogada.

 

“En muchas ocasiones sentía que me faltaban al respeto, que me discriminaban por el simple hecho de ser mujer; esto era como un insulto para mí”, recuerda Tapia-Ruano.

Sin embargo, la perseverancia de Tapia Ruano la ha llevado a conseguir muchos logros en su vida personal y profesional.

 

No solamente tiene su propio bufete Tapia-Ruano & Gunn. Hace algunos años, en 2006, fue elegida presidenta del American Immigration Lawyers Association de los Estados Unidos y también fue nombrada como una “súper abogada” en Chicago en 2001, hasta hoy en día.

 

“Es por mi familia, por mis raíces latinas que me han ayudado a disfrutar cada momento y cada triunfo en mi trabajo”.

 

Michele Agudelo es estudiante de periodismo y negocios de modas en Columbia College Chicago.

Claudia Mirza: El poder de reinventarse cada día

De una pequeña empresa de traducciones que comenzó en 2003 en su casa, Akorbi dio un salto impresionante para convertirse en una compañía global proveedora de soluciones de negocios multilingües, con presencia en más de 100 países, 700 trabajadores de tiempo completo y tiempo parcial, e ingresos de  $35 millones en ventas.

Bajo el liderazgo de su fundadora, la colombiana Claudia Mirza, Akorbi se ha convertido en la 12ma empresa en manos de mujeres de más rápido crecimiento en el mundo , de acuerdo con la Organización de Mujeres Presidentes, y la compañía de traducción e interpretación líder en Estados Unidos, según estudios de agencias independientes como Common Senses Advisory.

Mujer con visión, de trabajo incansable y multipremiada por su avance impetuoso, Claudia también atribuye su éxito a su capacidad de reinventarse usando nuevas estrategias y apoyándose en la tecnología moderna.

¨De la única manera que un pequeño negocio puede salir adelante es con innovación.¨ Así lo afirma Claudia Mirza, CEO (Chief Executive Officer) de Akorbi. Esta colombiana, radicada desde hace años en los Estados Unidos, amable y excelente comunicadora, vino ¨de abajo¨, para fundar una empresa pequeña de traducciones que hoy es una multinacional.

Negocios Now: ¿Cómo fue que se le ocurrió hacer una empresa de traducciones y por qué?

Claudia Mirza: Cuando vine a los Estados Unidos, pensé qué era lo que podía hacer que no necesitara tanto el idioma y me dije ¨las computadoras¨ y comencé en GTE. Luego que esa parte de la compañía cerró me fui a entrenar a trabajadores agrícolas en los hipódromos de los Raiders y fue donde comprendí que tenía oportunidad en el mercado. Entonces la Cámara de Comercio Hispana de Dallas me dijo que abriera un negocio en vez de estar pidiendo trabajo.

NN: ¿Y decidió abrir una empresa de traducciones?

CM: Comenzamos como Compañía de traducción.

PCN: ¿Cómo fue la evolución de una empresa pequeña a una empresa que es hoy multinacional?

CM: Tenemos 936 empleados. Ahora evolucionamos a soluciones globales, para compañías que necesitan abrir mercados; también tenemos la parte de interpretación telefónica, contratación de personal en diferentes idiomas, la traducción  y también Course Center Multilingual.

NN: La expansión ha sido desde el 2003. ¿En cuántos países están ahora?

CM: Estamos en República Dominicana, Colombia, Cabo Verde, Argentina, Perú y México, pero tenemos muchas relaciones internacionales con otros países.

NN: Para explicar la dimensión de su empresa, Akorbi, ¿es correcto que trabaja con 170 idiomas?

CM: Sí, apoyamos en 170 idiomas.

NN: ¿Y en término de ingresos?

CM: Este año cerramos con 35 millones.

NN: ¿Qué papel ha jugado la tecnología en su empresa?

CM: Nosotros estamos pasando a una nueva etapa, de la industrial a la tecnología. Conectamos al intérprete con el cliente y el intérprete une a veces a personas de la India con Tailandia. Tenemos que tener la capacidad de traer a un intérprete de cualquier parte del mundo, a esa llamada en segundos.

NN: Usted me dijo que es imposible ser empresario hoy sin tener tecnología.  ¿Es así?

CM: Esto es una economía global y nosotros ya no estamos compitiendo con las personas de nuestra misma zona postal, sino con el mundo, a través de internet.

NN: ¿Hay que reinventarse?

CM: Sí, es como un estudiante.

NN: Usted es una persona que ha venido de abajo hacia el éxito. ¿Cómo define eso en su vida?

CM: Creo que la parte esencial ha sido la educación, no he parado de estudiar. Actualmente estoy en la Universidad de Harvard haciendo un curso con empresarios locales. El programa se llama Owner President Management.

NN: ¿Cuál sería un consejo útil para empresarios pequeños?

CM: Uno de los errores que cometí cuando empecé el negocio es que me daba miedo contratar gente con mucha experiencia y contraté a graduados de la Universidad. Entonces me di cuenta que es muy importante tener un balance y el balance es traer gente experimentada que lo pueda ayudar a uno a llevar todos juntos el peso de tener un negocio. Pero lo más importante yo diría que es la innovación.

NN: Eso es muy bueno, nos sirve a todos. ¿Algo más que quisiera agregar?

CM: Tengo cuarenta y dos años, yo creo que es importante nunca dejar de utilizar la curiosidad. Hay gente muy buena en nuestro país, en los Estados Unidos. Tenemos que salir, todos esos pequeños negocios, a recorrer el mundo, a conocer gente, nuevos mercados.

NN: ¿Queda algo por decir?

CM: Sí, me gustaría decir que esto no hubiera sido posible sin mi esposo, Azam Mirza, que siempre ha estado de la mano, trabajando aquí conmig

Maria Guerra Lapacek, Mayor’s Director of Legislative Counsel and Government Affairs

Maria Guerra Lapacek is the Mayor’s Director of Legislative Counsel and Government Affairs, a key office that serves as liaison with elected officials, government agencies and community organizations at the local, state and federal levels.  She was the Commissioner of the Department of Business Affairs and Consumer Protection (BACP).

Guerra Lapacek replaces Anna Valencia, who was appointed City Clerk. Guerra Lapacek presently serves as the Commissioner of BAC. As Commissioner, she has led the department at a time of substantial change in the marketplace, having implemented regulations to innovative business models including ride- and house-sharing.

“As a native Chicagoan, I love my city, and I take immense pride in working hard on behalf of all of its residents,” Guerra Lapacek said. “I am honored and humbled by this appointment and look forward to working with elected officials and community organizations to achieve the Mayor’s vision for strong neighborhoods across this great city.”

Before being named Commissioner of BACP, Guerra Lapacek served as the First Deputy Director of the Office of Legislative Counsel and Government Affairs. She previously served as a Deputy Chief Financial Officer and in the Office of Management and Budget as a Deputy Budget Director, where she managed efforts to consolidate departments to save taxpayer dollars and implemented performance management measures for the City’s human infrastructure departments. Guerra Lapacek grew up mostly in the Humboldt Park neighborhood and attended Maternity BVM grammar school and Lane Technical High School. She received a law degree and MBA from DePaul University, and an undergraduate degree from Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania. She lives in the West Town neighborhood with her husband and two children.

Samantha Fields was appointed as the new BACP Commissioner

 

José Aybar: “Somos el diamante desconocido de la comunidad”

El presidente de Daley College asegura en entrevista con Negocios Now que su institución da a sus estudiantes una educación a nivel universitario de alta calidad.

Por Esteban Montero y Redacción

Para José Aybar Daley College es una institución educativa que está en movimiento y ofrece muchas oportunidades que aún no son bien aprovechadas por la comunidad.

“Somos la joya escondida de esta comunidad que todavía no ha sido descubierta por todos, pero este descubrimiento está en un proceso dinámico este año, porque nosotros estamos aquí para servir a la comunidad y darle un servicio académico de calidad comparable con cualquiera universidad en Estados Unidos”, dijo el entusiasta presidente al explicar los planes de esta casa de estudios.

Durante la entrevista, Aybar se toma su tiempo para sustentar sus afirmaciones, pero con tono firme dijo: “hay algo que es muy importante y que insisto en recalcar: nosotros estamos dedicados a darle al estudiante una educación de nivel universitario de calidad para que luego ellos puedan transferir ese conocimiento a una universidad de cuatro años y continuar con su carrera profesional. Nosotros, poco a poco, hemos incrementado los números en esa área”, reveló.

Las cifras avalan sus palabras. Bajo la presidencia de Aybar, se incrementó en un 84 por ciento el número de estudiantes que lograron su certificado y en un 61 por ciento, en licenciaturas, en el periodo de 2009 al 2015.

Los resultados académicos hicieron que este centro del sur de la ciudad fuera considerada por Community College Weekly, entre los colegios de su categoría de más rápido crecimiento en el país entre el 2011 y 2012, con un incremento de 14.1 por ciento.

“Lo que distingue a Daley College de otros centros similares es su énfasis en la eficiencia académica, en ayudar al estudiante y proveerles un vehículo para inser

En un ambiente hispano

Daley College se desenvuelve en un ambiente latino. En el año fiscal de 2015 los estudiantes hispanos eran el 71 por ciento del total.

“Así que culturalmente nosotros estamos enfocados en todo lo que hacemos, porque hay un ambiente muy latino, aunque mantenemos la infraestructura de valores del sistema norteamericano”, puntualizó.

Aybar apuntó que Daley College tiene estudiantes con IP Score (Integrated Postsecondary) que es nacional. “En 2009 teníamos el 7 por ciento de IP y ahora está subiendo a más del 22 por ciento, y esa es la razón por la que los estudiantes han tenido éxito y obtenido un certificado o título en 3 años”, afirmó.

“Damos un Título y también un Certificado que le da trabajo inmediato al estudiante. En otras palabras, con este certificado ellos pueden ir directamente al empleador y decirles que tiene un Certificado en Chart Development, y con eso ya puede ingresar a trabajar, explicó.

Aybar pone énfasis en la naturaleza de su institución. “Somos una College Comunitario. Y una cosa primordial para este concepto, es la palabra comunidad y nos hemos olvidado mucho de lo que significa la comunidad.

Es una de las cosas que debemos recordar y hacer énfasis en lo que significa este concepto porque su naturaleza y Daley College son parte de un sistema único que tiene que mantener una relación continua para poder seguir adelante. Es lo que nos hará subir el nivel educativo de nuestro estudiante, nuestro vecindario, nuestra comunidad y nuestro país”, dijo.

Sobre el futuro, el presidente del Daley College afirma que está en proceso la preparación de la base arquitectónica y sondeo de un terreno para levantar un edificio de $75 millones que va a ser dedicado a carreras de manufactura.

La iniciativa se mueve en la dirección de los propósitos de la ciudad de Chicago de crear 14,000 empleos de manufactura en la próxima década y abre una nueva oportunidad a jóvenes y adultos de la ciudad. El edificio de 105,000 pies cuadrados estaría listo para el otoño del 2018 y tendrá una capacidad para entrenar a unos 3,800 estudiantes al año.

“Estamos muy entusiasmados porque en ese edificio habrán carreras sobre ingeniería. Así es, Daley College está planeando ofrecer a nuestra comunidad una carrera de ciencias, de manufactura y de ingeniería. Porque el foco de nuestro College es la manufactura y eso lo ofreceremos muy pronto”, dijo.

 

Touchdown con los Vikingos de Minessota

Juan Gaytán es de esos emprendedores que se abrazan a un sueño y no lo abandonan hasta conseguir –futbolísticamente hablando- un touchdown.

Su compañía, Monterrey Security, Inc. acaba de lograr un contrato por cinco años para la custodia de otro equipo poderoso: Los Vikingos de Minnesota.

Ahora la empresa basada en Pilsen, es la responsable de velar por la seguridad de dos archirrivales: Los Vikingos y los Osos de Chicago, un cliente de 16 años.

La noticia llega solo un año después de que Monterrey de que conectara un batazo de jonrón al ser la elegida de los Cachorro de Chicago Cubs para cuidar el estadio de los Wrigley Field regalando a Negocios Now otro breaking news y una aclamada portada en nuestras páginas de sociales.

En entrevista exclusiva con Negocios Now, un entusiasmado Gaytán habla del nuevo reto en Minnesota, de su filosofía de negocio y cuenta con emoción de la forma en que los directivos de los Osos de Chicago reaccionaron ante la noticia de que cuidarian también a sus históricos enemigos.

Juan Gaytán nunca se ha detenido en el empeño de crecer en grande, llevando a Monterrey Security más allá de las fronteras de su ciudad natal, pero jamás imaginó que en ese intento sería el vigilante de dos enemigos acérrimos.
Juan Gaytán es de esos emprendedores que se abrazan a un sueño y no lo abandonan hasta conseguir –futbolísticamente hablando- un touchdown.

Su compañía, Monterrey Security, Inc. acaba de lograr un contrato por cinco años para la custodia de otro equipo poderoso: Los Vikingos de Minnesota.

Ahora la empresa basada en Pilsen, es la responsable de velar por la seguridad de dos archirrivales: Los Vikingos y los Osos de Chicago, un cliente de 16 años.

La noticia llega solo un año después de que Monterrey de que conectara un batazo de jonrón al ser la elegida de los Cachorro de Chicago Cubs para cuidar el estadio de los Wrigley Field regalando a Negocios Now otro breaking news y una aclamada portada en nuestras páginas de sociales.

En entrevista exclusiva con NN, un entusiasmado Gaytán habla del nuevo reto en Minnesota, de su filosofía de negocio y cuenta con emoción de la forma en que los directivos de los Osos de Chicago reaccionaron ante la noticia de que cuidaría también a los acérrimos enemigos.

Un Gaytan Entre Osos y Vikingos

Gaytán sonríe con humor de solo pensar en los días en que Monterrey de cuidará las instalaciones de ambos equipos cuando se enfrenten en Soldier Field o el US Bank Stadium, de Minneapolis.

Porque Gaytán no es deportista ni fanático, sino más que todo el CEO de la única empresa latina que ha podido poner un pie en la exclusiva liga NFL.

“Tenemos la custodia de dos de solo 32 equipos de la NFL en todo el país, dijo entusiasmado. “Y son dos grandes, son rivales de muchos años”.

Por supuesto que fue un proceso de selección difícil. Pero cuál es la razón por la que los Vikingos escogieron a Monterrey Security, echando a un lado a compañías de seguridad cinco y 10 veces más grandes que la del empresario de origen mexicano?

“Nuestra visión, -asegura sin titubear- nuestra filosofía de trabajar con la propia comunidad. Eso es lo que ha marcado la diferencia entre nosotros y otras compañías de seguridad”, afirmó el otrora policía de la Ciudad de Chicago.

Siguiendo esta regla, Gaytán y su gente desembarcaron en Minneapolis tanto pronto recibieron luz verde de los Vikingos, abrir oficinas e iniciar el proceso para la contratación de 2000 personas, pero no justamente poniendo avisos en periódicos o anuncios en la TV local.

“Los estamos buscando en la propia comunidad, en los barrios modestos, en las iglesias, apoyándonos en líderes de organizaciones comunitarias. Esos trabajos son para la propia gente de Minnesota. Nadie mejor que ellos para velar por su propio estadio y recibir esta oportunidad”, afirmó el empresario.

El reto de Gaytán y su gente es soberbio. Especialmente por ser un territorio nuevo, fuera de Chicago.

Al parecer en Minnesota no han tenido una empresa con esa filosofía, de hecho muchos ni conocían la empresa de seguridad que estuvo con los Vikingos por 20 años, dijo.

“Me han dicho que será difícil, que eso nunca se ha hecho aquí, no creo que pueda ser realidad, afirma. Y yo le respondió, tengan fe, apóyenos y verán, lo hemos hecho por 17 años”, comenta Gaytan, para quien representa una ventaja “ser una empresa multicultural, con visible presencia de latinos y afroamericanos, radica la fuerza y el crecimiento de Monterrey Security.

“Muchos han preguntado, por qué no hay más policías latinos y afroamericanos. Bueno es, entre otras cosas, porque no le dan oportunidad. Aquí lo hemos preparado y han tomado experiencia y, gracias a eso, se han convertido en policías, bomberos u otro tipo de empleo como vigilante.

Están los “Bears” molesto con Monterrey por cuidar a sus rivales. De ninguna manera. Todo lo contrario. “Antes de empezar este proceso fuimos a pedir permiso a los dueños de los Osos, y no solo tuvimos su aprobación, sino que hicieron un video para manifestar su apoyo.

Fue muy emocionante. Un video que nos hizo llorar. Eso fue muy grande para nosotros. Es un reconocimiento a los años de trabajo, sus deseos de que sigamos adelante, que somos una familia que quiere dar apoyo a la comunidad.

Las partes aún no revelan el monto del acuerdo. Pero para Monterrey Security, la única empresa hispana que ha llegado a un arreglo con las cuatro de las más importantes organizaciones deportivas del país (NFL, MLS, MLB y PGA ), el dinero no es lo más importante ahora.

Por lo pronto, su empresa se prepara a toda velocidad para estar lista en julio próximo cuando el US Bank Stadium, un coloso construido a un monto de 1.1 billones -el más costoso en la historia de la liga- abra sus puertas para la celebración de un concierto de country y de rock, antes de que arranquen los partidos de la NFL.

“Tenemos que enseñar al país que sí se puede con nuestra filosofía de involucrar a la propia comunidad y animar a otras personas a que sigan nuestro camino”, insistió.

 

Cuando la comida mexicana se sirve con ‘Atzimba’

Mexicana de origen, la chef vive el orgullo de haber creado en Chicago una compañía de banquetes enfocada en compartir la comida de su país y difundir la historia detrás de cada plato que elabora.

Tal como dijera a Negocios Now, su principal intención con Atzimba Caterings and Events, es ayudar a preservar la gastronomía prehispánica michoacana.

“Cuando llego a un evento, o hago un evento, siempre le cuento a la gente cuál es la historia del platillo, cuál es su aporte gastronómico, todo”, relata Pérez, quien se graduó como chef en México, en 1995.

La empresaria de 42 años no para de trabajar en función de su negocio, en el que no sólo funge como chef, sino también como panadera, pastelera, decoradora y bartender.

“Yo hago de todo, pues mi carrera fue muy completa en México. Fíjate que a los 15 días de graduada, abrí mi propia pastelería allá. A Chicago llegué en 1996, y desde entonces he seguido actualizándome”, puntualiza la emprendedora, quien desde el año pasado también enseña a estudiantes de la Chicago Public School acerca de la comida mexicana y latina.

“Muchas veces, a los papás se nos olvida enseñarles a los niños sobre nuestros platos y por eso se están perdiendo nuestras raíces” —remarca—, al tiempo que adelanta sus planes futuros de crear una escuela y una fundación que ayuden a preservar la cultura gastronómica de su país natal, y principalmente la michoacana.

Pérez rememora que la comida mexicana fue reconocida por la UNESCO como Patrimonio Cultural Inmaterial de la Humanidad mayormente gracias a la gastronomía de Michoacán, de ahí su apego a los platillos típicos de esa región, a los que además les imprime su sello personal.

“La verdad es que siempre me salgo de los menús tradicionales”, sostiene, y agrega que sus platos más aceptados son: el pastel de tres leches relleno con frutas, el pie de queso con chongos zamoranos, la cochinita pibil, el mole verde, los tamales prehispánicos (considerados gourmet) y la birria. Entre las bebidas figuran las de mezcal, el tequila de chocolate y el trago conocido como beso maya, principalmente.

Aunque a esta empresaria le va bien elaborando y sirviendo sus platillos en diferentes eventos (bodas, reuniones corporativas, encuentros VIP, etc.), señala que tan pronto como dentro de un año podría contar con un local propio, ya que mucha gente se lo está pidiendo. “Yo me caracterizo por trabajar bajo presión y ser versátil”, subraya con firmeza, de ahí que no le resultaría un problema desempeñarse en todas y cada una de sus funciones.

Dada su condición de emigrada, esta emprendedora alega que le encanta ayudar a sus semejantes, por ejemplo, a los dreamers, para quienes ha organizado eventos a fin de recaudar fondos. Esto, de conjunto con chefs de talla internacional y funcionarios mexicanos, fundamentalmente.

Aparte de la comida mexicana, Pérez también se especializa en la gastronomía española, italiana, francesa, china, colombiana, argentina y guatemalteca, entre otras.

“Cuando uno trabaja en lo que le gusta, y además recibe el fruto de su esfuerzo, todo lo hace con pasión”, concluye.

Por Migdalis Pérez

Negocios Now announces the first list of Latinos 40 Under 40

   Negocios Now announces today their first list of Latinos 40 Under 40 in Chicago, to be celebrated with a special digital edition and an event in February.

   The 40 talented Latinos were selected after a three-month nomination period, and they represent business, government, nonprofits, politics, sports and education, among other fields

   “Just as we had anticipated, the honorees are young Latinos with tremendous talent who not only give their legacy for the Hispanic community, but for society as a whole,” said Clemente Nicado, publisher and editor-in-chief of Nicado Publishing Company, owner of Negocios Now. “They are the present and the future of this city and we are very proud to have them as part of our first list of Latinos 40 Under 40 in Chicago.

“Many of them are millennials, a segment very important to Negocios Now, which, since its foundation in 2007, has made an effort to be a bridge between different generations in the Hispanic community,” Nicado continued.

To celebrate the achievements of this younger generation of Latino trailblazers who are making their mark on Chicago, Negocios Now is organizing a presentation and networking event Feb. 18 at Nacional 27, 325 W. Huron St., in Chicago.

The inaugural members of the Latino 40 Under 40 in Chicago cohort are on Negocios Now web site.

Nicado Publishing launched with resounding success the first Who’s Who in Hispanic Chicago two years ago, publishing a Negocios Now special edition and hosting a gala event to recognize the Latino leadership in various fields.

Founded in 2007, Negocios Now is a national award-winning publication and the Midwest’s most dynamic news source for growing Hispanic businesses, focusing primarily on business owners, entrepreneurs and economic development in the Latino community.

Negocios Now has received 12 awards from the National Association of Hispanic Publications (NAHP). In May 2012, The Chicago Headline Club, a leading association of local professional journalists, awarded Negocios Now the Peter Lisagor Award for General Excellence, a first for a Hispanic newspaper in Chicago.

David Hernandez: From Cuba to Liberty Power

Negocios Now’s National award-winning article at NAHP Convention, Dallas, Tx- October 20, 2015

The meteoric rise of entrepreneur David Hernandez began with bad news in December 2001, when his energy industry employer filed for bankruptcy. The Cuban immigrant used the opportunity to finish the business plan for what would eventually form Liberty Power.

The company he co-founded with Alberto Daire was born in an adverse environment. In the wake of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the country was suffering from a credit crisis, growing unemployment, a volatile energy market, and widespread economic uncertainty. It was hardly an ideal time to start a business, but Hernandez and his partner remembered the phrase, “No hay mal que por bien no venga,” or, as they say in English, “Every cloud has a silver lining.”

 The insight he gained at his former employer helped him spot opportunity and gave him the experience needed to meet future challenges successfully. “At that company I learned about the deregulation of the energy industry and how firms were fighting to eliminate the monopoly that existed in one of the most important economic sectors: the energy sector,” Hernandez recalls.

Working in the company’s wholesale and retail electrical services trading division, he realized there was a market niche that wasn’t being adequately served within the highly competitive energy industry. “While other companies within the industry went after large-scale customers, no one was providing service to small and mid-sized customers,” he says.

 This was the logic that drove the creation of Liberty Power, a leading Hispanic enterprise that provides electricity to businesses, government agencies and consumers nationwide. Headquartered in Fort Lauderdale and with an office in Chicago, its 2012 revenue exceeded $700 million.

 The co-founder and CEO of Liberty Power immigrated to the United States as a young boy, and he shared his parents’ enthusiasm for the potential this country offered. But he soon learned that an entrepreneurial spirit was not enough; he also would need to study. His motivation earned him the distinction of being the first in his family of seven siblings to finish college. Hernandez graduated magna cum laude from Palm Beach Atlantic University in Florida with a bachelor of science degree in accounting and earned an MBA from New York University — all before undertaking his electrifying business venture with Alberto Daire, president of Liberty Power.

What specifically does Liberty Power do?

  Liberty Power is a retail electricity supplier, which means we supply electricity to end-user consumers in restructured or deregulated energy markets where consumers can shop for their electricity supply like any other product or service. We work with the local distribution company to deliver our customers’ electricity over the utility’s poles and wires. In most markets the customer still receives one bill separated into two main parts – supply and delivery. The supply portion is what they purchased from Liberty Power, while the fees for delivery service go to the local distribution company (Con Ed in the Chicago area).

Can you explain the reasons behind your company’s success?

Liberty Power is an entrepreneurial company. Our competitive edge is our nimbleness which sets us apart from our competitors, many of which have parent companies in the Fortune 500. As the company continues to grow, we continue to maintain a small business atmosphere where we can quickly shift resources and focus in order to capitalize on opportunities that arise across our national footprint. Larger companies are often set in their ways and don’t react and evolve as quickly as Liberty Power.

What were the greatest challenges Liberty Power faced, and what are the biggest challenges of today’s marketplace?

We faced many challenges over the years, from risking every cent we had to start the business to discovering additional obstacles along the way within the industry. The nature of doing business in today’s energy markets provides a variety of challenges. We’ve dealt with a credit crunch, hurricanes and other extreme weather events, regulatory uncertainty, and ever-changing market conditions, just to name a few. A large part of the value Liberty Power provides is insulating our customers from these types of risks and headaches. We are blessed to have a smart and experienced team to navigate Liberty Power through these challenges while protecting our customers.

How can Hispanic businesses take advantage of Liberty Power’s services?

Businesses both large and small, Hispanic or non-Hispanic, can take advantage of Liberty Power by simply calling us at 1-866-POWER-99 (1-866-769-3799) or visiting our website atwww.libertypowercorp.com. One of our energy consultants will evaluate your energy needs and help determine the product that works best for your individual situation. Electricity is often one of the largest costs in running a business, so it is definitely worth the time to shop around and find the company and product that works best for you.

How important is Chicago in your expansion strategy?

More broadly speaking, Illinois is a very important market to Liberty Power as well as in the energy industry overall. We first entered this market in 2007 when many consumers weren’t even aware that they could shop for electricity supply. Today, over 3 million accounts (representing the majority of accounts) in Illinois have switched away from the utility. We will continue to strengthen and grow our business in Illinois in the future.

Speaking of your expansion goals, what is “the sky” for Liberty Power?

Historically, Liberty Power has been what the industry calls a “pure play” electric retailer. Our focus has always been in buying electricity in wholesale commodity markets at the lowest possible price and then passing those savings along to our customers. We continue to evaluate expanding our operations into other areas of the value chain, such as generation, as well as look toward expanding our current suite of products and services. Our ultimate vision is to be the preferred choice for innovative retail energy services and solutions.

Liberty Power has made an impact on the community through scholarship programs and other efforts. How important is it for the company to support its community?

Liberty Power believes in the importance of supporting the community. Having experienced so much good fortune of our own over the years, giving back is a rewarding way to help others. One area Liberty Power is very passionate about is preparing our youth for the challenges and opportunities of the future, which is why we created the Liberty Power Bright Horizons Scholarship in 2013. Through this alliance with the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (USHCC) and the USHCC Foundation, Liberty Power has committed to providing $100,000 in college scholarships over a span of five years, with a focus on rewarding students studying STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics).

As one of the most successful Hispanic entrepreneurs in the country, what advice can you share with other entrepreneurs?

Two keys to success that I’d like to share include: Do something you are passionate about. The most successful people in life are simply following their passions. Secondly, make sure you have the right people on your team. At Liberty Power we look for people that are humble, hungry, smart, and share the company’s vision. (Published in 2014)

Insurance Exec Cesar Pinzon Found New Direction by Changing Course

After 10 years in Corporate America, Cesar Pinzon Jr. decided that he needed to be on a different path.

“I found that no matter how hard I worked, I never made as much money as the person next to me because they had been there longer,” recalled Pinzon, who now is the Agency Sales Vice President for American Family Insurance. “I really wanted the opportunity to own my own business, so I started exploring the insurance field. I met with several different companies, and it looked like a tremendous opportunity.”

He embarked on a fact-finding mission, getting more serious about making a move and seeking out contacts who might help propel his plans. His research led him to Madison, Wis.-based American Family Insurance, a diversified Fortune 500 insurer founded in 1927 with a strong presence in the Midwest.

“I was connected with a sales manager named Jaime Mercado, he was out of the Little Village in Chicago, and he highlighted what a career with the agency could do for me and my family,” he said. “So in 1999 I opened an insurance agency in Bolingbrook and started a scratch agency.”

“Scratch” is just what it sounds like – building a business from the ground up. Pinzon was now an agent, but the reality of his situation sunk in quickly. He began networking extensively, building on referrals and generally doing whatever it took to succeed. He even began mentoring other insurance agencies throughout the Chicago area, and that helped convince him that getting into management was the best way to give back to his community.

Rising in the Ranks

This time his hard work paid off. American Family approached him about joining its management ranks.

“I really had no intention of going back into a corporate environment or a Fortune 500 company,” he said. “But I discovered that I was becoming somewhat of an inspiration to Latino families in Bolingbrook. They would bring their kids in, second generation, and they would do the translating, and the message to their kids was, ‘You can do this too, you can own a business.’ I got the bug that I really wanted to do what my manager did for me – give other people that opportunity. So I took over my own district, and that was probably one of the most defining professional moments for me.”

In his first four years as an agency manager, his district was twice recognized as the top district in the state. He was soon promoted again, to Sales Director of the Chicago Metro sales territory, where he had nine sales managers reporting to him, generating over $300 million in premiums. In the late 2000s, American Family consolidated its state structure, and the company once again looked to Pinzon. By 2010 he was responsible for 400 agents, 15 sales managers, and just over $500 million in premiums.

“That was a tremendous experience that really broadened my horizons,” he said.

The next chapter in Pinzon’s journey began in 2013, when after 44 years in the Chicago area – the last 14 with American Family – he accepted an opportunity and moved to Madison, where he served as Life Sales & Support Director. Less than two years after transferring to the home office, Pinzon was promoted again, to Sales Vice President of the East Region, which encompasses Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Georgia.

His success did not come without personal challenges and hard-learned lessons, though. His daughter became ill early in his career, testing his ability to juggle work and family life.

“She went into heart failure, and I remember being in the hospital and having to put ice chips on her lips because they had to intubate her and put her into a coma until they could figure out what was going on,” he recalled. “As I was doing that, one big reflection that hit me right between the eyes was that I had not spent enough time home at dinner. I was eating appetizers at chamber events instead of being at the kitchen table. The lesson I learned was balance. That’s easier said than done, and sometimes you find yourself slipping back. You have to have open, positive communication with your family. If you are stable in your home life, you can be the best you can be in your work life.”

Dedication to Diversity

Throughout his career, Pinzon has focused on organizational diversity, which he says is an essential ingredient in any growth strategy.

Customers today expect any company they do business with to understand them and connect with them,” he said. “It’s not enough to have satisfied customers – we want customers who are loyal, and the only way we can have that is to deliver experiences that resonate with them. You can’t achieve that if your workforce and your talent doesn’t represent your marketplace. If you don’t have diversity internally, you can’t expect to connect with your customers.”

Even during his early days with American Family, Pinzon took simple but effective steps to ensure that his team embraced diversity.

“I had agencies all the way from the south side of Chicago through the Little Village, Pilsen, Humboldt Park, and all the way to Edison Park on the north side,” he said. “We made sure to have our meetings throughout everyone’s communities and with their customers, so we had Irish agents eating in Puerto Rican restaurants. It gave us all a better understanding of each other and really shaped us as a group.”

Today he approaches diversity from a larger perspective, establishing inclusionary hiring, training, and outreach practices throughout the enterprise.

“At American Family, we bring in local organizations and partner with local charities to help create a collective understanding between us and the community,” he said. “I spend a lot of time educating our sales directors on why diversity is important, and they truly embody it and embrace it. They get shoulder to shoulder with their agents at community events, whether they’re supporting literacy in Chinatown through dragon boat races or participating in housing fairs.”

Although Pinzon has now graduated to the executive ranks, he hasn’t forgotten what it’s like to start on the ground floor – to face the daunting challenge of establishing yourself within an organization and climbing the ladder.

“My first advice would be to be true to yourself – I think that’s absolutely critical,” he said. “Be proud of your culture and your heritage. And most importantly, share your cultural experiences in the workplace because it improves the relationships with your coworkers. Sharing drives collaboration, which drives innovation, and certainly relationships help create opportunity for you as you grow. It also helps organizations build better products.”

Pinzon also encourages younger workers to take advantage of the knowledge other generations can offer.

“Be patient and embrace mentors,” he said. “Hispanics have tremendous mentors; we always want to reach out. Do a lot of listening and expand your network but also make sure you reach out to those who have gotten there before you and leverage what they’ve learned. We talk a lot about dreams around here. Every step of the way I have had the opportunity to live my dream; your dreams are unlimited.”

 

“Hard work speaks for itself”

The owner of Old Veteran Construction celebrates his participation in a hotel and sports complex being built next to McCormick Place with an investment of $635 million.

By Clemente Nicado, Publisher & Editor in Chief

Some days in José Maldonado’s life are deeply rooted in his memory, just as a skyscraper is rooted in its concrete foundations.

One of these days happened not long ago when the executives of Clark Construction, a national leading company with $4 billion in sales, visited him at his office on the south side of the city, to tell him that his company, Old Veteran Construction, Inc., had been selected to participate in a megaproject next to McCormick Place’s Expo Center.

It was by no means just any job. They were talking about the construction of a 1200-room Marriott hotel as well as a sports complex for DePaul University, recently begun with a projected cost of $635 million.

“It is not only the biggest project I’ve ever had, but also one of the biggest in the City of Chicago today,” he says with amazement. “Sometimes I just sit down and ask myself if I’m awake or if I’m dreaming.”

Clark Construction did not embark in this joint venture with just any amateur. Founded 30 years ago, OVC has earned a reputation as a minority-run general construction company delivering high-quality work on time in numerous projects for private and government industries.

In 2014 alone OVC reported $135 million in sales with projects varying from construction design, remodeling, new construction and improvements to personal training contracts, and it already has commitments for approximately $220 million.

“I can’t believe all that my company has done in 30 years,” Maldonado said. “I feel blessed for having the team I have. They are like my family.”

This entrepreneur’s history, with all kinds of challenges throughout his career, makes this success a milestone. The son of Puerto Rican parents with few resources, Maldonado was raised in the southern part of the city, in the so-called “projects,” housing for low-income families. He started working at 9 years of age and could barely finish his high school studies. Yet here he is decades later.

His environment could have thrown him down the path of gangs and violence. But the young man worked in any honest job that helped him move forward, from cleaning shoes to working in construction, based on his great faith in God.

During this time, there was an infamously unforgettable day that marked the life of the entrepreneur-to-be. He worked for a construction company in Frankfort, Illinois, when someone stole his tools and work vehicle.

“I went to see my boss and told him what happened. I told him I was responsible for the loss and asked him not to take away so much money,” Maldonado remembers. “I said I wanted to buy a house and my wife was pregnant.”

But his plea had no effect on his boss, who took away half his salary.

“Me fogoné,” he says using the Puerto Rican slang to express a lot of fiery anger. “I went back home and told my wife: I quit. Logically, she was very worried.”

He opened his company in 1984. He was 19 years old. He didn’t want to call it Maldonado Construction, and chose a name full of symbolism: Old Veteran Tuck-pointing, to honor his father, a veteran of the Korean War. In 1992, already established as a corporation, it was renamed as Old Veteran Construction, Inc.

“I thought about my father, all that he went through to raise seven sons with a low income and the pride he would feel seeing me take this step in life,” he remembers.

OVC started with a chimney construction job that paid $200 and has been guided by a CEO who learned from every setback. The company’s beginnings included a team of “five people in a small room” and a truck with a sign that read, “Hard work speaks for itself.” Today OVC employs 130 workers.

Driven by the winds of opportunity in Chicago, OVC currently is a solid company with presence in Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Missouri, New Mexico, Ohio, New York, Oklahoma, South Carolina and Wisconsin.

Maldonado attributes this growth to many magical words: perseverance, quality delivery, professionalism, teamwork and his obsession to help other Latinos.

It turns out that OVC usually doubles the offer to its potential clients when outsourcing is involved. If, for example, he is asked to bring 15% minority subcontractors with his proposals, Maldonado submits 25%. “I always employ more Latino people than asked. I like to help our people,” he said.

There is another ingredient that makes OVC strong in the bid for contracts: It has $200 million in bonding, the construction insurance that guarantees work will be finished, even if setbacks exist.

“It is difficult for most small companies to have a bonding in order to participate in the big government contracts. We don’t have this problem,” said Alex Polanco, the company’s VP.

Maldonado thinks about growth, of course, but moderate growth. “I want to make the company grow bit by bit. Currently I am comfortable where we are, because I can have control,” Maldonado said. “I’m able to know what is happening at any time and act quickly so the client is not affected.”

And when he talks about control, for him this means the ability to take off his suit, wear his boots and go to work, just like any of his employees, trusting that the people who back him up (at the office) are guarding the house.

“I’ve gone to a work site, started sweeping and those employees who don’t know me have asked ‘who is that one sweeping?,’ and that’s how they know me”, he says, smiling as if he were doing it again.

 

Adela Cepeda: The Billion Dollar Woman

Get ready to toast.  Adela Cepeda is about to make history. As early as this summer, the founder of A.C. Advisory expects to reach the $100 billion mark in bond deals.  That’s right. One. Hundred. Billion. Dollars.

Behind this astonishing figure lies a tale of effort worth several times that amount. The tale of a little girl who emigrated from Colombia to New York with her parents, and who grew up to be a true giant among the movers and the shakers of Wall Street and Chicago finance, commanding respect and inspiring others along the way.

Ms. Cepeda is a woman in finance. What you would call high finance, as in the highest caliber finance you’ll find on Wall Street and in the stock market. Because she deals in transactions ranging from the $100 millions to multi-billions, large figures tend to dance around in her head. Over time, the dance has come to be second-nature for this Colombian-born, Harvard educated professional.

“There comes a point where the numbers are so large that you almost have to cut off the zeros at the end, just to keep them in order,” Ms. Cepeda explains with a smile.

Ms. Cepeda founded A.C. Advisory, Inc., a municipal advisory firm, 17 years ago. Under her leadership, the firm is now ranked among the “Top Ten” financial advisories in the nation, and is expected this summer to reach $100 billion mark in transactions.

However, Ms. Cepeda prefers to point out the “positive impact” of the deals on the communities involved, rather than to focus on any single sum “regardless of how high it may be.”

“The most important thing is the positive impact I am making on the communities, and on individuals within those communities. Usually, the deals we’re structuring go to improve roads, build bridges, airports, aqueducts, re-model schools, or to fund programs in which numerous corporations participate,” explains Ms. Cepeda.

Ms. Cepeda, an economics major with an MBA from the University of Chicago, is an expert at analyzing bond sale structures, a skill she began 32 years ago when she graduated from Harvard and took a position at Smith Barney, one of the nation’s leading financial firms. There she moved up the ranks of the corporate finance department. As vice president of mergers and acquisition, Ms. Cepeda calculated complex corporate valuations, and managed large stock and bond transactions.

With all this experience under her belt, in 1995, Ms .Cepeda decided to take a huge leap forward by opening her own firm, A.C. Advisory Inc. (so named for her initials). “My first clients were City of Chicago and Cook County. The mayor at the time, Richard M. Daley, asked us to help them in funding bonds for the city, and that’s how we started building our experience in this business.”

And that’s how Ms. Cepeda entered into the world of financial advisory, where working up to 13-hour days, seven days a week, sometimes up to six weeks at a time, non-stop is commonplace.

Thanks to the passion and energy she brought to what she describes as “the only thing I know, my professional world” the firm gained some heavyweight clients, among them the City of New York, and the States of New York, Connecticut and Illinois.

Ms. Cepeda’s main role as financial advisor is to help municipalities structure “the most attractive and cost-effective bond financing deals.” She advises on all aspects of the deal, from the maturity date of the bonds, the interest rate, the buyers, and even how the bonds should be marketed so they are well received in the market.  Often, in her zeal to sell and implement the transactions, she becomes the client’s right hand.

Ms. Cepeda is quick to credit the success of her firm, which generates between $1 to $2.5 million in annual sales, to a team of highly skilled professionals. “I have a great team who not only bring ideas, but are able to analyze and evaluate other people’s ideas,” she explains.

Ms. Cepeda’s well known experience has landed her on several mutual funds boards, including UBS, Morgan Stanley and Mercer Global Investments. She feels this reflects her coming full circle in her career, not only as an entrepreneur but also as a corporate director.

The entrepreneur laments that there are so few Latinos in the financial advisory business, and in the finance industry in general.  “Perhaps math can be a bit intimidating to some,” she explains. “It isn’t to me. I feel comfortable telling a client: ‘with this $470 million funding you can save $12 million.’ I feel really good when I quantify what the impact of my recommendations can bring to a project.”

“Latinos need to have a better understanding of capitalism. When we come to this country, we become part of its capitalist society. So it’s essential that we grasp numbers, and what’s being added or subtracted,” Ms. Cepeda added. Ms. Cepeda came to the U.S. at the age of six with her parents, and recalls that in the early days she would cry because she didn’t know enough English to do her homework. That changed quickly, and soon Ms. Cepeda was excelling in school.

Her professional achievements notwithstanding, Ms. Cepeda insists her greatest pride rests in her three daughters: Alexis, also a Harvard grad, who works as an investment banker in New York; Alicia, a graduate of Brown University and currently a digital project manager for President Obama’s re-election campaign; and Laura, the youngest, a student at Duke. Ms. Cepeda’s husband, Albert Maule, died of cancer when Laura was only four, leaving Ms. Cepeda to raise their girls alone.

Everything Ms. Cepeda has achieved in her career stems from the responsibility she feels toward her daughters. “I told myself that I couldn’t fail them. I focused on being there for them, in every sense of the word, just as my parents were for me.”

This article was published in 2012 by Negocios Now. Actually Adela has made over 120,000 million in transactions.

Insurance Exec Cesar Pinzon Found

New Direction by Changing Course

 

After 10 years in Corporate America, Cesar Pinzon Jr. decided that he needed to be on a different path.

“I found that no matter how hard I worked, I never made as much money as the person next to me because they had been there longer,” recalled Pinzon, who now is the Agency Sales Vice President for American Family Insurance. “I really wanted the opportunity to own my own business, so I started exploring the insurance field. I met with several different companies, and it looked like a tremendous opportunity.”

He embarked on a fact-finding mission, getting more serious about making a move and seeking out contacts who might help propel his plans. His research led him to Madison, Wis.-based American Family Insurance, a diversified Fortune 500 insurer founded in 1927 with a strong presence in the Midwest.

“I was connected with a sales manager named Jaime Mercado, he was out of the Little Village in Chicago, and he highlighted what a career with the agency could do for me and my family,” he said. “So in 1999 I opened an insurance agency in Bolingbrook and started a scratch agency.”

“Scratch” is just what it sounds like – building a business from the ground up. Pinzon was now an agent, but the reality of his situation sunk in quickly. He began networking extensively, building on referrals and generally doing whatever it took to succeed. He even began mentoring other insurance agencies throughout the Chicago area, and that helped convince him that getting into management was the best way to give back to his community.

 

Rising in the Ranks

This time his hard work paid off. American Family approached him about joining its management ranks.

“I really had no intention of going back into a corporate environment or a Fortune 500 company,” he said. “But I discovered that I was becoming somewhat of an inspiration to Latino families in Bolingbrook. They would bring their kids in, second generation, and they would do the translating, and the message to their kids was, ‘You can do this too, you can own a business.’ I got the bug that I really wanted to do what my manager did for me – give other people that opportunity. So I took over my own district, and that was probably one of the most defining professional moments for me.”

In his first four years as an agency manager, his district was twice recognized as the top district in the state. He was soon promoted again, to Sales Director of the Chicago Metro sales territory, where he had nine sales managers reporting to him, generating over $300 million in premiums. In the late 2000s, American Family consolidated its state structure, and the company once again looked to Pinzon. By 2010 he was responsible for 400 agents, 15 sales managers, and just over $500 million in premiums.

“That was a tremendous experience that really broadened my horizons,” he said.

The next chapter in Pinzon’s journey began in 2013, when after 44 years in the Chicago area – the last 14 with American Family – he accepted an opportunity and moved to Madison, where he served as Life Sales & Support Director. Less than two years after transferring to the home office, Pinzon was promoted again, to Sales Vice President of the East Region, which encompasses Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Georgia.

His success did not come without personal challenges and hard-learned lessons, though. His daughter became ill early in his career, testing his ability to juggle work and family life.

“She went into heart failure, and I remember being in the hospital and having to put ice chips on her lips because they had to intubate her and put her into a coma until they could figure out what was going on,” he recalled. “As I was doing that, one big reflection that hit me right between the eyes was that I had not spent enough time home at dinner. I was eating appetizers at chamber events instead of being at the kitchen table. The lesson I learned was balance. That’s easier said than done, and sometimes you find yourself slipping back. You have to have open, positive communication with your family. If you are stable in your home life, you can be the best you can be in your work life.”

 

Dedication to Diversity

Throughout his career, Pinzon has focused on organizational diversity, which he says is an essential ingredient in any growth strategy.

Customers today expect any company they do business with to understand them and connect with them,” he said. “It’s not enough to have satisfied customers – we want customers who are loyal, and the only way we can have that is to deliver experiences that resonate with them. You can’t achieve that if your workforce and your talent doesn’t represent your marketplace. If you don’t have diversity internally, you can’t expect to connect with your customers.”

Even during his early days with American Family, Pinzon took simple but effective steps to ensure that his team embraced diversity.

“I had agencies all the way from the south side of Chicago through the Little Village, Pilsen, Humboldt Park, and all the way to Edison Park on the north side,” he said. “We made sure to have our meetings throughout everyone’s communities and with their customers, so we had Irish agents eating in Puerto Rican restaurants. It gave us all a better understanding of each other and really shaped us as a group.”

Today he approaches diversity from a larger perspective, establishing inclusionary hiring, training, and outreach practices throughout the enterprise.

“At American Family, we bring in local organizations and partner with local charities to help create a collective understanding between us and the community,” he said. “I spend a lot of time educating our sales directors on why diversity is important, and they truly embody it and embrace it. They get shoulder to shoulder with their agents at community events, whether they’re supporting literacy in Chinatown through dragon boat races or participating in housing fairs.”

Although Pinzon has now graduated to the executive ranks, he hasn’t forgotten what it’s like to start on the ground floor – to face the daunting challenge of establishing yourself within an organization and climbing the ladder.

“My first advice would be to be true to yourself – I think that’s absolutely critical,” he said. “Be proud of your culture and your heritage. And most importantly, share your cultural experiences in the workplace because it improves the relationships with your coworkers. Sharing drives collaboration, which drives innovation, and certainly relationships help create opportunity for you as you grow. It also helps organizations build better products.”

Pinzon also encourages younger workers to take advantage of the knowledge other generations can offer.

“Be patient and embrace mentors,” he said. “Hispanics have tremendous mentors; we always want to reach out. Do a lot of listening and expand your network but also make sure you reach out to those who have gotten there before you and leverage what they’ve learned. We talk a lot about dreams around here. Every step of the way I have had the opportunity to live my dream; your dreams are unlimited.”

 

“Hard work speaks for itself”

José Maldonado, dueño de Old Veteran Construction, celebra su participación en las obras de un hotel y complejo deportivo que se levantan junto McCormick Place, a una inversion de $635 millones.

 

Clemente Nicado, Editor

 

Hay días en la vida de José Maldonado cimentados en su memoria profunda, como la base de concreto de un rascacielos.

 

Uno de ellos ocurrió no hace mucho tiempo, cuando ejecutivos de Clark Construction, una empresa líder nacional que factura 4 billones anuales en ventas, fueron a su oficina del sur de la ciudad para informarle que habían escogido a su compañía, Old Veteran Construction, Inc. para participar en un megaproyecto junto al centro de exposiciones de McCormick Place.

 

Y no era cualquier obra. Se trata de la construcción de un hotel Marriott de 1,200 habitaciones y un complejo deportivo para DePaul University, que recientemente comenzaron a levantar un costo de $635 millones.

“No solo es el mayor proyecto que he tenido, sino también uno de los más grandes actualmente de la ciudad de Chicago”, afirma con asombro.

 

“A veces me siento y me pregunto, estoy despierto o estoy soñando”, confiesa.

 

Clark Construction no se unió a ningún improvisado. En 30 años de existencia, OVC ha ganado reputación como empresa de construcciones generales en manos de minorías, entregando a tiempo y calidad un

sinnúmero de obras para el sector privado y de gobierno.

 

Solo en 2014, OVC  facturó  $135 millones en ventas con proyectos que van desde diseños de construcción, renovación, nuevas construcciones y mejoramientos hasta contratos de entrenamiento de personal, mientras ya suma compromisos por unos $220 millones.

 

“No puedo creer todo lo que ha hecho mi compañía en 30 años”, reflexiona Maldonado. “Me siento bendecido de tener el equipo que tengo, es como mi familia”.

 

La historia de este empresario probado en todo tipo de retos en su larga carrera, hace de su logro un hito.  Hijo de padres boricuas de economía precaria, Maldonado  fue criado  en el sur de la ciudad en los llamados “Proyectos”,  viviendas para familias de bajos ingresos.  Trabajó desde los 9 años y apenas pudo terminar sus estudios  secundarios. Y aquí lo tienen décadas después.

 

De modo que el ambiente que lo rodeaba pudo haberlo empujado al camino de las pandillas y la violencia. Pero el joven de entonces hizo cualquier cosa digna que lo sacara adelante, desde limpiar zapatos hasta trabajos en la construcción  afincado en su enorme fe en Dios.

 

Por aquel tiempo, hubo otro día nefastamente inolvidable que marcó la vida del futuro empresario. Laboraba para una compañía de la construcción  en Frankfort, Illinois, cuando alguien le robó sus herramientas del vehículo de trabajo.

“Fui a ver a mi jefe  y le comenté lo que había ocurrido. Le dije que era responsable por la pérdida y le pedí de favor que no me quitara tanto dinero –recuerda-, que quería comprar una casa y mi señora estaba embarazada”.

Pero su solicitud no surtió ningún efecto en su jefe que le arrancó la mitad del salario.

“Me fogoné”, relata en el argot boricua para expresar mucha molestia encendida,  “llegué a mi casa y le dije a mi señora: I quit”. Había renunciado. “Lógicamente, ella estuvo muy preocupada”.

 

Abrió su empresa en 1984. Tenía 19 años. No quería llamarla Maldonado Construction, y buscó un nombre cargado de simbolismo.  Old Veteran Tuck-pointing, en honor a su padre, un veterano de la guerra de Corea. En 1992, ya formalizada como una corporación, la rebautizó como la hoy flamante Old Veteran Construction, Inc.

 

“Pensé en mi papá, en todo lo que pasó para criar a siete hijos con escasos recursos y el orgullo que sentiría por verme dar este paso en la vida”, evoca.

 

OVC empezó  haciendo una chimenea por solo $200 de la mano de un CEO que aprendió de cada tropiezo y con un equipo de “cinco personas en un cuarto chiquito y al volante de una camioneta con un letrero que decía: “Hard Work speaks for itself”. Hoy contrata a 130 trabajadores.

 

Empujada por los vientos de oportunidades en Chicago, OVC es hoy una sólida  compañía con presencia además en Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Missouri, Nuevo México, Ohio, Nueva York, Oklahoma, South Carolina y Wisconsin.

Maldonado atribuye ese crecimiento a muchas palabras mágicas: constancia, calidad en la entrega de los trabajos, profesionalismo, trabajo en equipo y su obsesión de ayudar a otros latinos.

Resulta que OVC suele doblar la oferta a sus potenciales clientes cuando se trata de subcontrataciones. Si, por ejemplo,  le exigen que traiga con sus propuestas a 15% de subcontratistas minoritarios, Maldonado presenta 25%.  “Siempre pongo más latinos de lo que piden, me gusta ayudar a nuestra gente”, indicó.

Hay otro ingrediente que hace fuerte a OVC en la disputa de contratos: tiene  $200 millones de bonding, el monto de seguro de construcción que se requiere para garantizar que la obra sea concluida, aún si surgen  contratiempos.

“Es difícil para la mayoría de pequeñas empresas tener un bonding para participar en los grandes contratos de gobierno. Nosotros no tenemos ese problema,” acota Alex Polanco, vicepresidente de la compañía.

 

Maldonado piensa en el crecimiento, por supuesto, pero moderado. “Quiero  crecer la compañía poco a poco,  ahorita estoy a gusto donde estoy,  porque puedo tener control.  Me permite saber qué está pasando en todo momento para actuar con rapidez y no afectar al cliente.

Y cuando habla de control, significa a veces para él quitarse el traje, ponerse  botas e ir a trabajar: como cualquiera de sus empleado, confiado en que la gente que dejó atrás (en la oficina), cuidan la casa.

 

“He ido a una obra, me he puesto a barrer y los empleados que no me conocen han preguntado ¿quién es ese que está barriendo?, así me conocen”, dice, y vuelve a sonreír como si lo hiciera de nuevo.

José Maldonado, dueño de Old Veteran Construction, celebra su participación en las obras de un hotel y complejo deportivo que se levantan junto McCormick Place, a una inversion de $635 millones.
José Maldonado, dueño de Old Veteran Construction, celebra su participación en las obras de un hotel y complejo deportivo que se levantan junto McCormick Place, a una inversion de $635 millones.

“Sólo tenía $200 cuando compré la primera tienda”

Del libro Asî lo hicieron-

José Jiménez es de esas personas a quien el conejo de las oportunidades no le puede saltar impunemente delante de los ojos. La forma en que el dueño de Carnicerías Jiménez inició su hoy respetado patrimonio familiar, así lo atestigua.

Era 1975.  Un italiano vendía en Chicago una tiendita en $3,000. Jiménez tenía solo $200,  lo suficiente para hacer un depósito en el banco, y la compró.  Todavía conserva el recibo de $2,800 como una reliquia.

Un año después vendió el negocio en $45,000, una suma que le permitió adquirir un préstamo para comprar de golpe un mercado y el edificio donde se encontraba,  y  fundar Carnicería Jiménez.

Desde entonces el crecimiento fue en espiral, algo no común en una empresa hispana de la época, granjeándose la admiración de la comunidad hispana de Chicago e incluso nacional.

Jiménez asegura que el éxito de su negocio, con 37 años de existencia, se debe también a la gente que le rodea, incluidos los empleados, y el entorno familiar.

“Somos una familia muy unida, que trabaja duro, incluida por la parte de mi señora, Guadalupe”, señaló.

Y pensar que cuando empezó su vida empresarial, sus aspiraciones solo eran “hacer un poco de dinero para mandarle a mi mamá en Jalisco”, recordó.

Quizás de su madre, una mujer humilde y arraigada en su fe católica, fue de donde Jiménez  heredó el atributo de dar sin mirar a quien, sólo por ayudar al prójimo y por el cual ha tenido su recompensa.

     El negrito más bonito y bueJimenez 700no

De hecho, al salir de su natal Jalisco, en 1969, en busca de una vida más próspera en los Estados Unidos, se despidió de su madre con la promesa de “no cambiar” y de tener siempre “mucha fe en Dios”.

De profunda fe católica, Jiménez es un devoto de San Martín de Porres, el santo peruano que tenía una preocupación notable por los pobres y de quien se cuenta que las personas desamparadas acudían a él para que les diera de comer o los curase.

Se afirma que Martín de Porres también cuidaba de los animales y que, de todas sus virtudes, sobresalía su humildad y que distinguió por ser alguien que siempre priorizó las necesidades de los demás, por encima de las propias. Martín es uno de los santos negros canonizado en América Latina.

Jiménez admira la historia de Martín a quien llama con cariño “el negrito más bonito y bueno del mundo que he conocido”.

Y su arraigada fe y espíritu emprendedor ha sido un poderoso motor de Carnicerías Jiménez, y  explica el gran corazón caritativo de su propietario, quien no vaciló un segundo para mandar ayuda a las víctimas del devastador terremoto de Haití, de las inundaciones en Guatemala o de un sismo en su país, México,  e incluso en su propio negocio, donde suele contratar a personas minusválida.

No en balde el jalisciense ha sido de los pocos latinos que han sido honrrado con el “Jefferson Award”, un premio que recibió en el Capitolio de Washington DC, y que se concede a personas por su ayuda desinteresada a la comunidad y por su servicio público.

 

Promesa cumplida

La palabra se cumple, pero una palabra ante una madre es sagrada: “He cumplido con la promesa que hice a mi madre. Yo le dije que no iba a cambiar y que siempre tendría mucha fe en Dios, que es lo que alimenta a uno…especialmente en tiempos difíciles”.

Porque como todo empresario, el camino el éxito de Jiménez también ha estado repleto de obstáculos que ha podido sobrevolar con pragmatismo y su astucia natural para los negocios, como lo demostró con la apertura  en el 2011 de una tienda en Addison, al oeste de Chicago.

Un año antes, el empresario se vio obligado a cerrar uno de sus supermercados en Bensenville, debido a los trabajos de expansión del aeropuerto O´Hare.  Lo primero que hizo, lógicamente, fue lamentarlo, y lo segundo,  buscar de inmediato un sitio para abrir otro y no perder a sus fieles clientes.

La experiencia no pasó de largo ante sus ojos: “Me di cuenta que muchos de mis clientes venían de Addison (a dos millas y media de Bensenville) y rápido decidimos abrir uno allá”.

Sin embargo, ¿qué pasaría con sus clientes de mucha lealtad que deja atrás en  Bensenville  y que comúnmente no van a Addison… a la competencia?   Los clientes también son sagrados. El empresario abrió entonces en Bensenville Jiménez Express and Barkery, un mercado más pequeño que los demás, pero con lo suficiente para curar la  nostalgia.

¿Hasta dónde va a llegar la expansión? ¿Cuántas carnicerías Jiménez más veremos en Chicago?

“Mis hijos me están recomendando detenernos aquí (en Jiménez Express) y cuando la economía se componga un poco, seguir pa’arriba”, dijo para luego advertir al “conejo de la oportunidad” que “no puede estar saltando impunemente” delante de sus ojos.

“Ahorita hay muchas oportunidades (para hacer negocios), si vemos una no la vamos a dejar ir”, dijo en entrevista realizada en el 2011 (Publicado en el libro “Así lo hicieron” – Plaza Editorial).

 

 

 

 

 

Los testamentos de Jenny Pedroza

Hacer un testamento es más que estipular la repartición de bienes; es, de hecho, un plan de vida contra eventualidades.

Con 13 años de experiencia como abogada, Jenny Cruz Pedroza se especializa en planes de sucesión de empresas, lo cual incluye testamentos y fideicomisos.

Desde su oficina en el 8544 S. Cícero  y en Oak Brook ayuda a quienes tienen una empresa o un patrimonio a elegir un plan para la transferencia de propiedad en caso de muerte o accidente.

Pero la oriunda de Chicago no siempre estuvo en este campo.

“Durante mi época en la universidad trabajé en un bufete especializado en propiedad intelectual”, recuerda Pedroza, quien se graduó de la escuela de leyes de John Marshall Law School de Chicago en 2001.

‘Me comunicaba con otros abogados de todo mundo para hablar sobre los portafolios de trademark (propiedad intelectual)”, agrega.

En 2005 abrió su propio bufete, donde atendía casos tan variados como corporaciones y derecho en bienes raíces.

Pero un día, decidió formar una familia y empezó a trabajar tiempo parcial.

No fue sino hasta hace tres años, cuando ayudó en calidad de consultora a una colega, que Pedroza volvió a ejercer la abogacía a tiempo completo.

Se trataba de ayudar a su colega con unos contratos empresariales.
“Ví que había una necesidad muy grande. Como la abogada no hablaba español, ella no servía a esta comunidad (hispana)”, dice Pedroza.

“Hay muchos empresarios latinos. ¿Qué pasa si le sucede algo al dueño de la empresa? ¿Si muere sin ningún plan? Ocurre un desastre. Se pierde mucho dinero. El patrimonio involucrado se va en pleitos legales”, explica.

“Hay leyes de Illinois que controlan el patrimonio si uno muere con o sin testamento”.

De acuerdo con datos del ramo, el número de blancos que planean la sucesión patrimonial supera con creces el de afroamericanos y latinos.

Mientras que el 52 por ciento de los adultos blancos carecen de testamento, sólo uno de tres afroamericanos adultos y uno de cuatro hispanos adultos sí tienen uno, según un sondeo de Harris Interactive, empresa del grupo Nielsen.

“Hay latinos que tienen bienes que proteger empresarios, ejecutivos, maestros. Es cuestión de educarlos”, señala Pedroza. “Yo les propongo las opciones. Ellos deciden”, agrega.

 

De acuerdo con la abogada, el precio de no hacer un testamento o fideicomicio puede resultar hasta tres veces más caro que los honorarios que ella cobra, además del tiempo.

“Hubo un caso en el que murió un señor que tenía un patrimonio valuado en 120 mil dólares. Como murió sin plan (de sucesión), el caso se tardó un año para poder hacer la transferencia de propiedad”, recuerda.

“Para evitar eso, yo ayudo a planear un poquito para que descansen en paz”, añade.

Eso incluye reunirse con el cliente cuántas veces sean necesarias hasta que éste comprenda plenamente los planes de sucesión.

“En una ocasión, fue necesario hacer tres citas con un cliente y su familia para explicarles a fondo en qué consistía el plan de sucesión”, cuenta Pedroza.

“El señor tenía que saber en qué estaba invirtiendo. Al final, estaba contento porque entendió la importancia del plan y se sintió bien de dejar una propiedad a cada uno de sus tres hijos y otra a su esposa”, agregó.

Los planes de sucesión también sirven en caso de accidente.

“El dueño de un negocio puede quedar incapacitado, digamos, por un choque. Si el dueño (o dueña) no tiene un plan, entonces la ley de Illinois establece que tanto la esposa como el esposo e hijos pueden manejar el negocio”, dice.
Lo anterior, en algunos casos, no necesariamente podría corresponder a los deseos de la persona incapacitada, explica.

“Un plan de sucesión, entonces, es una inversión en caso de accidente”, dice.

Afirma que, en su experiencia, las mujeres y las hombres con negocios son igual de previsores cuando se trata de hacer planes de testamento.

“La proporción es 50-50. Pero las mujeres son más receptivas, sobre todo si hay una necesidad”, matizó.

Laura Müller sazonando en Youtube

Jamás imaginó que su vida periodística terminaría en una cocina, y mucho menos que el espacio para mostrar sus recetas culinarias fuera un canal de Youtube con más de 143,000 “ciber-comensales”.
El secreto de Laura Müller para atraer a tantos seguidores a su sitio digital podría estar en una mezcla de su espíritu emprendedor y su propia historia personal.
Porque Laura es de esas tantas mujeres que luchan contra el sobrepeso ideando sus propias recetas, pero ella lo logró con tal éxito que decidió compartir su técnica de “alimentación saludable” con el mayor número de personas posible.
“Para quienes tenemos problemas de salud debido a un metabolismo lento o una mala alimentación es muy difícil cambiar de hábitos, es muy frustrante visitar al médico o al nutriólogo y que te digan ´necesita usted comer saludable´, pero realmente nadie te enseña a hacerlo”, estimó.
De eso se trata Las Recetas de Laura: enseñar a las personas a comer alimentos “bajos en grasa de forma rica y nutritiva”, dijo.
“La comida es uno de los grandes placeres de la vida, pero en la actualidad ese placer nos está llevando a contraer enfermedades muy graves como diabetes, hipertensión y obesidad. Lo que ofrecemos es comer lo que te gusta con pequeñas modificaciones que te ayuden a bajar el contenido calórico manteniendo el mayor nivel nutricional”.
La irrupción en Youtube

Tan convencida estaba de sus recetas, que decidió emprender su  negocio en un canal propio de Youtube bajo el titulo “Las Recetas de Laura”.
Comenzó ella sola en 2011, grabándose a sí misma con una pequeña cámara montada en un trípode, editando ella misma los videos y subiéndolos a la plataforma de Youtube.
“Yo había escuchado de personas que hacían dinero a través de las redes sociales; en ese momento me encontraba como voluntaria en una ONG y al no hallar trabajo decidí crear mi propia fuente de empleo. Tardé un año para recibir mi primer cheque, y fue muy pequeña la cantidad de dinero recibida, pero sabía que la perseverancia tendría su recompensa”, recordó.
En realidad, Müller no era una desentendida en el tema. Su tesis de posgrado en periodismo fue de redes sociales como herramienta periodística y eso  la impulsó a valerse de éstas para promover su trabajo.
A su iniciativa empresarial se sumó un año después Jorge Salazar, entonces su novio -y hoy esposo-, otro periodista de profesión, y juntos decidieron usar el canal de Youtube para promover el negocio.
“Mi marido tenía experiencia produciendo programas de radio y televisión, así que cuando comenzó a apoyarme formalmente en el proyecto pudimos dar un brinco en cuanto a la calidad de lo que producíamos”

Cuando llega El Reto

Tras un tiempo dedicándose solo a los vídeos, Müller vio la necesidad de crear un programa más completo para sus seguidores.
“Nos pedían menús diarios y asesorías, fue aquí que surgió la oportunidad de hacer negocio con la creación de El Reto, una página electrónica exclusiva a la que solo pueden acceder los suscriptores de este programa, quienes pagan una cuota mensual de $14,99.
“En El Reto ofrecemos los menús diarios, la lista del Supermercado semanal y asesoría en vivo por Internet una vez a la semana para resolver dudas y mantener a las personas motivadas a lograr sus metas”.
Al momento el canal de Youtube de Las Recetas de Laura cuenta con más de 139 mil seguidores lo que ha traído nuevas oportunidades de negocio.
“Nos hemos posicionado comoLaura muller baja una opción confiable lo que nos ha valido que importantes marcas internacionales se acerquen a nosotros para promoverlas, este año estaremos trabajado a nivel nacional con Pastas Barilla en Estados Unidos y Huevos San Juan en México” afirma Müller.
Con estas recetas Müller afirma que se puede disfrutar de unos ricos chilaquiles mexicanos, tan solo evitando freír las tortillas y utilizando yogurt en lugar de crema.
“Son estos pequeños trucos los que te ayudarán a mantener esas recetas de nuestros países que tanto nos gustan en alternativas saludables”.

Un negocio familiar
Jorge Salazar, quien se encarga de la administración y representación de Las Recetas de Laura, afirma que este negocio a través de las redes sociales les ha permitido crear una empresa familiar que ahora no solo se limita a la alimentación saludable, sino también a la asesoría de creación de contenido para redes sociales.
“La experiencia que nos han dado estos años de trabajo ahora nos permite asesorar a otros negocios sobre la creación de contenido que sirva para promover sus empresas”, apuntó Salazar.
Las Recetas de Laura (lasrecetasdelaura.com) ahora es parte de Media Forward Productions INC, una empresa dedicada a la asesoría y producción para redes sociales.
Müller es una ferviente creyente de que cualquier persona sin necesidad de presupuesto puede emprender su propia empresa.  “Todo lo que necesitas son las ganas de crear y una buena idea, no te limites por no tener los recursos, si pones empeño en lo que deseas crear las cosas poco a poco se irán dando”.
Y  ella es un vivo ejemplo de lo anterior. “Hoy me da risa ver mis primeros vídeos. Era terrible frente a la cámara, mis sartenes eran feos y viejos, la calidad de los vídeos y la luz, muy deficientes, pero eso no fue para mí un obstáculo para comenzar con lo que soñaba.
Poco a poco  se abrieron las puertas de las oportunidades y hoy la pareja cuenta con una empresa en la que ambos pueden desarrollar su profesión de periodistas y le da la libertad de administrar su tiempo.
“Creemos que nuestro éxito se debe a la perseverancia y empatía que logramos con nuestros seguidores al ofrecer una alternativa saludable y deliciosa,  algo diferente a lo que existía”, aseguró.

Carmen Maldonado: Una criolla con sazón

Esta es la historia de una mujer a quien un golpe en la vida la puso, súbitamente, al timón de una empresa.

 

La Criolla, como se denomina su compañía, fue fundada en 1957 en Chicago por su esposo, Avelino Maldonado, quien inició su aventura empresarial vendiendo algunas especias que trasladaba en el maletero de su auto.

 

El recuerdo de aquel hombre con quien fundó su futuro la acompaña siempre: “Él compraba ajo, lo colocaba en un frasco, le ponía una etiqueta y se los vendía a mercaditos independientes. Para 1972 la compañía estaba bien encaminada”.

 

Contagiada por el espíritu emprendedor y visionario de su pareja, Carmen deja atrás su carrera de enfermería, estudia Negocios en la Universidad de Loyola y se convierte en la secretaria de su esposo.

 

Crecer ante la adversidad

 

Pero ocurrió un hecho inesperado. Avelino fallece en un accidente automovilístico en 1992 y esta madre de tres hijos, un menor y dos adolescentes, se hizo cargo de La Criolla.

 

Lo recuerda con orgullo: “Poco después de la tragedia, vinieron muchos a proponerme una sociedad o comprar el negocio. Yo les decía que iba a enfrentar el desafío”.

 

Con la ayuda de su equipo Carmen entró de lleno en la vida empresarial empujada por la necesidad de mantener a su familia y la pasión emprendedora de su esposo.

 

Para lidiar con el conflicto de ser madre y empresaria, la boricua modernizó las operaciones con tecnología, cambió etiquetas a los productos e inició una agresiva estrategia de ventas, en un terreno dominado por hombres.

 

Y La Criolla empezó a crecer y sus ventas superan hoy los 4 millones de dólares, gracias también a un incremento en la oferta; y de clientes como Wal-Mart y Jewel-Osco, así como mercados independientes, como Tony’s y Cermak, entre otros.

 

La empresaria también atribuye el éxito de la compañía a la calidad de sus productos que, según afirma, son ciento por ciento naturales, sumado al envase de cristal que impide su descomposición.

 

Los sabores del mundo

 

La Criolla importa de Latinoamérica o de España especias y hierbas para cocinar, aceitunas y aceite de olivo. También vende frutas y otros alimentos en conserva, además de pastas, harina, miel de abeja y una variedad de frijoles. En total son más de 150 productos.

Guiada por el sentido visionario de Avelino, quien registró el nombre de la empresa desde que distribuía las especias en el maletero de su auto, Carmen asegura que en los negocios siempre hay que pensar en el siguiente paso y también le pone sazón a la Internet para aumentar sus ventas.  

 

Su idea de servicio y eficacia es sencilla: “La idea es darle acceso a gente que habitualmente compraba mi producto y que se han mudado a otros lugares del país. Muchos me llaman y se los mando por correo”.

 

     Carmen, quien realiza una labor filantrópica ayudando a niños huérfanos en Casa Norte, sueña con convertir a La Criolla en una empresa nacional y enfocada en ese objetivo sigue echado a la olla mucho sacrificio como condimento.
Este perfil de Carmen Maldonado fue recogido en el libro Así lo hicieron (Plaza Editorial-2012), de Clemente Nicado, Publisher y Editor Jefe de Negocios Now.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arte y Vida con Amor

 Amor Montes de Oca deja su huella promoviendo el arte y la cultura Latinos en la comunidad.

Hispanic News Agency (HINA)

Por amor al arte es una frase que en Latinoamérica significa hacer las cosas sin recibir nada a cambio. Hasta cierto punto, el servicio de información cultural Arte y Vida que se ha ganado un espacio en Chicago, es hijo de la pasión por el arte de Amor Montes de Oca.

Siete años atrás, Amor sintió la frustración de ver tantos espectáculos artísticos culturales en la comunidad latina con una audiencia pobre.

Era entonces una estudiante de Arte de la Universidad de De Paul y buscaba con frecuencia un evento o manifestación cultural para asistir. Y encontró muchos, y casi todos con el mismo problema.

  “Un día asistí a un festival de cine mexicano, con excelentes películas, y no había casi nadie en  la sala”, recuerda.

   Pero Amor enseguida comprendió que había un problema de comunicación, porque era consciente que en la comunidad hay muchos que gustan, como ella,  de la música, el teatro, la poesía, la pintura, la danza y de otras expresiones artísticas.

  “Note también que las organizaciones artísticas no estaban “enganchadas” con su audiencia latina o tenían muchas dificultades para promover sus espectáculos”, dijo la

   Entonces fue que a Amor se le ocurrió  lanzar en el 2003 Arte y Vida, una revista cultural y servicio de correo directo que conectara  a la comunidad con los espacios artísticos, eventos, etc.

   “Todo estaba muy disperso. No existía una comunicación efectiva de los programas culturales.  Busqué la manera de ponerlos todo en un mismo lugar, hacerlo breve, con un mensaje fácil y atractivo.

  “Me di cuenta que muchos artistas independientes no cuentan con un agente de Relaciones Públicas, especialmente los más pequeños, y no podían llegar con facilidad a la gente que buscan los conciertos.

  Amor tenía otro motivo para emprender su aventura empresarial.  Resaltar que la cultura latina era mucho más que la salsa.

  “Hemos tratado de romper estereotipos, promoviendo obras de teatro, literatura, cine, poesía y la cultura en general.

  Hoy siente orgullo de que mediante su página, la gente ha descubierto muchos artistas y han enriquecido su vida cultural.  “Chicago es rico en variedad, hay campos para todos los tipos de artistas y de arte.  Su objetivo: seguir creciendo con información relevante.  “La cultura está en todas partes, es un segmento muy importante para la comunidad”, asegura.

  Pero no todo su esfuerzo es por amor al arte.  Ella es también una empresaria que vive del servicio que ofrece y que se enfrenta a las mismas vicisitudes de un pequeño dueño de negocio, lidiando diariamente con los mismos desafíos de cualquier otro emprendedor.

 “Me gustaría ver que las empresas y la gente de negocio que se benefician de la comunidad, apoyen más los eventos culturales y el arte. Ayuder a construir comunidades inteligentes es algo que beneficia a las propias empresas y a la vez que valoren la cultura de nuestras vidas.

 

 

“Hay que hacer lo que hay que hacer”

José Sánchez ha saneado las finanzas en Norwegian American Hospital con tal éxito que ahora su nombre suena para CEO de Hospitales y Salud del Condado de Cook

Hace tres años y medio, José Sánchez asumió como CEO de Norwegian American Hospital con la encomienda de rescatarlo.

“El hospital estaba prácticamente en la bancarrota”, cuenta Sánchez en entrevista con Negocios Now

Para colmo, este sanatorio categoría “safety net” estaba a punto de ser desacreditado por The Joint Commision, o TJC, organización que califica los hospitales a nivel nacional.

“La relación entre los médicos era bastante mala, al igual que la calidad de la atención. No había relaciones con la comunidad. Todos los archivos se hacían en papel”, ahonda Sánchez.

Antes de dirigir este hospital del barrio puertorriqueño de Humboldt Park, Sánchez había salvado dos sanatorios “safety net” en la ciudad de Nueva York.

Pero tan pronto llegó a Chicago, enfrentó una situación externa que amenazaba desangrar a Norwegian American: el gobierno de Illinois iba a recortar los fondos de Medicare. 

Este seguro para ancianos y menores, así como el seguro Medicaid para personas de escasos recursos, representan el 80 por ciento de los pacientes de este hospital de 200 camas.

Sánchez aplicó un torniquete.

“Organicé a miembros de la comunidad. Cogimos tres guaguas (autobuses) y nos fuimos a Springfield, donde se bate el cobre, para hablar con los legisladores”, recuerda Sánchez.

Al final, Springfield no recortó los fondos.

El episodio refleja la filosofía de este puertorriqueño de 60 años, quien terminó de formarse en la ciudad de Nueva York a donde llegó a buscarse la vida a los 16 años.

“Hay que hacer lo que hay que hacer”, enfatiza. “Hay que ser práctico”.

Que hablen las acciones. En 2009, un año antes de la llegada de Sánchez, Norwegian American cerró con pérdidas de 10 millones de dólares.

Al cabo de su primer año como CEO, Sánchez logró reducir ese déficit en casi la mitad: 4.5 millones de dólares. En 2011 y 2012 cerró con ganancias.

También reemplazó a médicos y a la mesa directiva, agregó servicios como la unidad de Sicología de 15 camas y el Departamento de Oncología, y digitalizó todos los expedientes.

Más aún, bajo el liderazgo de Sánchez, Norwegian-American logró pasar la acreditación de TJC tras siete años de estar en la cuerda floja.

¿Futuro CEO de Salud de Condado de Cook?

Semejante hazaña no ha pasado inadvertida. El gobernador Pat Quinn ha nombrado a Sánchez en las comisiones estatales de Salud y de Finanzas para mejorar el sector salud en Illinois.

Sánchez también integra las mesas directivas de Illinois Hospital Association que aglutina a 52 sanatorios ‘safety net”, de Puerto Rican Alliance, y del influyente Chicago City Club donde

es el único latino.

 

Ahora su nombre suena para suceder a Ramanathan Raju como CEO de Salud y Hospitales del Condado de Cameron. Raju, quien trabajó con Sánchez en el sector salud de Nueva York, se va del cargo después de exitosos tres años.

“Me han recomendado para este puesto. Y yo he expresado interés”, dijo Sánchez.

 

Pero también tiene sus reservas.

 

“Aquí la pregunta es: ¿Estará dispuesto el gobierno de la ciudad de Chicago a que un latino ocupe ese cargo?”, dijo. “¿Habrá el suficiente apoyo para eso?”

Además de Sánchez, habría al menos otros cuatro candidatos al puesto.

 

“De todos los candidatos ninguno tiene la experiencia que tengo yo”, dijo al señalar su hoja de vida.

 

Antes de Norwegian American, Sánchez se desempeñó durante 11 años como vicepresidente senior de Generations+/Northern Manhattan Health Network, una de las redes de salud más grandes de la ciudad de Nueva York, con un presupuesto anual de 800 millones de dólares y 6 mil 400 empleados.

“Elevé la calidad del servicio a los pacientes en Nueva York”, señaló Sánchez, quien tiene una licenciatura en sicología y una maestría en trabajo social.

 

Subrayó que este tipo de puesto requiere trabajar no solamente con el Medicare y el Medicaid, sino también con los legisladores para conseguir fondos.

 

“Quien no entienda eso, no entiende cómo funciona esto”, enfatiza.

 

En ese sentido, Sánchez destaca el apoyo del senador estatal Willie Delgado y de la representate estatal Cyntia Soto a Norwegian American.

“Todo el mundo es importante en Springfield, especialmente el Caucus Latino y ellos dos porque representan a Humboldt Park”, explica.

 

También pondera la campaña del congresista Luis Gutiérrez (D-Illinois) a favor de una reforma migratoria, la cual, dice, beneficiaría a los hospitales como Norwegian American frente a la Ley de Cuidado de Salud.

 

“Como concepto, Obamacare es fabuloso”, explica Sánchez. “Pero hay un problema que no se ha resuelto: los 12 millones de indocumentados”.

Obamacare no incluye a los inmigrantes indocumentados, quienes recurren a sanatorios como Norwegian American, donde el 15 por ciento no paga  ? solo el 5 por ciento de los pacientes tiene seguro comercial, el resto tiene Medicare o Medicaid.

 

Al margen de Obamacare, los hospitales “safety net” seguirán atendiendo a aquellos sin seguro médico. Una reforma migratoria, explica, compensaría los fondos federales y estatales que podrían perder los hospitales “safety net” como consecuencia de Obamacare.

 

“Sin una reforma no podemos seguir echando para adelante, no podemos ser productivos”, dijo.

Mientras, dice, todavía hay mucho por hacer en Norwegian American.

 

“Mi trabajo no ha terminado aquí. Estoy comprometido con Humboldt Park, con mi personal del hospital y con la junta directiva”, dice.

“Me siento bien. Estoy disfrutando este trabajo, pero no es fácil. Este edificio tiene más de 100 años y a veces cuando no se rompe una caldera, se rompe otra cosa”, agrega.

David Hernandez: From Cuba to Liberty Power

By Clemente Nicado, Publisher & Editor in Chief

The meteoric rise of entrepreneur David Hernandez began with bad news in December 2001, when his energy industry employer filed for bankruptcy. The Cuban immigrant used the opportunity to finish the business plan for what would eventually form Liberty Power.

  The company he co-founded with Alberto Daire was born in an adverse environment. In the wake of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the country was suffering from a credit crisis, growing unemployment, a volatile energy market, and widespread economic uncertainty. It was hardly an ideal time to start a business, but Hernandez and his partner remembered the phrase, “No hay mal que por bien no venga,” or, as they say in English, “Every cloud has a silver lining.”
   The insight he gained at his former employer helped him spot opportunity and gave him the experience needed to meet future challenges successfully. “At that company I learned about the deregulation of the energy industry and how firms were fighting to eliminate the monopoly that existed in one of the most important economic sectors: the energy sector,” Hernandez recalls.
Working in the company’s wholesale and retail electrical services trading division, he realized there was a market niche that wasn’t being adequately served within the highly competitive energy industry. “While other companies within the industry went after large-scale customers, no one was providing service to small and mid-sized customers,” he says.
   This was the logic that drove the creation of Liberty Power, a leading Hispanic enterprise that provides electricity to businesses, government agencies and consumers nationwide. Headquartered in Fort Lauderdale and with an office in Chicago, its 2012 revenue exceeded $700 million.
   The co-founder and CEO of Liberty Power immigrated to the United States as a young boy, and he shared his parents’ enthusiasm for the potential this country offered. But he soon learned that an entrepreneurial spirit was not enough; he also would need to study. His motivation earned him the distinction of being the first in his family of seven siblings to finish college. Hernandez graduatedmagna cum laude from Palm Beach Atlantic University in Florida with a bachelor of science degree in accounting and earned an MBA from New York University — all before undertaking his electrifying business venture with Alberto Daire, president of Liberty Power.
What specifically does Liberty Power do?
    Liberty Power is a retail electricity supplier, which means we supply electricity to end-user consumers in restructured or deregulated energy markets where consumers can shop for their electricity supply like any other product or service. We work with the local distribution company to deliver our customers’ electricity over the utility’s poles and wires. In most markets the customer still receives one bill separated into two main parts – supply and delivery. The supply portion is what they purchased from Liberty Power, while the fees for delivery service go to the local distribution company (Con Ed in the Chicago area).
Can you explain the reasons behind your company’s success?
Liberty Power is an entrepreneurial company. Our competitive edge is our nimbleness which sets us apart from our competitors, many of which have parent companies in the Fortune 500. As the company continues to grow, we continue to maintain a small business atmosphere where we can quickly shift resources and focus in order to capitalize on opportunities that arise across our national footprint. Larger companies are often set in their ways and don’t react and evolve as quickly as Liberty Power.
What were the greatest challenges Liberty Power faced, and what are the biggest challenges of today’s marketplace?
We faced many challenges over the years, from risking every cent we had to start the business to discovering additional obstacles along the way within the industry. The nature of doing business in today’s energy markets provides a variety of challenges. We’ve dealt with a credit crunch, hurricanes and other extreme weather events, regulatory uncertainty, and ever-changing market conditions, just to name a few. A large part of the value Liberty Power provides is insulating our customers from these types of risks and headaches. We are blessed to have a smart and experienced team to navigate Liberty Power through these challenges while protecting our customers.
How can Hispanic businesses take advantage of Liberty Power’s services?
Businesses both large and small, Hispanic or non-Hispanic, can take advantage of Liberty Power by simply calling us at 1-866-POWER-99 (1-866-769-3799) or visiting our website atwww.libertypowercorp.com. One of our energy consultants will evaluate your energy needs and help determine the product that works best for your individual situation. Electricity is often one of the largest costs in running a business, so it is definitely worth the time to shop around and find the company and product that works best for you.
How important is Chicago in your expansion strategy?
More broadly speaking, Illinois is a very important market to Liberty Power as well as in the energy industry overall. We first entered this market in 2007 when many consumers weren’t even aware that they could shop for electricity supply. Today, over 3 million accounts (representing the majority of accounts) in Illinois have switched away from the utility. We will continue to strengthen and grow our business in Illinois in the future.
Speaking of your expansion goals, what is “the sky” for Liberty Power?
Historically, Liberty Power has been what the industry calls a “pure play” electric retailer. Our focus has always been in buying electricity in wholesale commodity markets at the lowest possible price and then passing those savings along to our customers. We continue to evaluate expanding our operations into other areas of the value chain, such as generation, as well as look toward expanding our current suite of products and services. Our ultimate vision is to be the preferred choice for innovative retail energy services and solutions.
Liberty Power has made an impact on the community through scholarship programs and other efforts. How important is it for the company to support its community?
Liberty Power believes in the importance of supporting the community. Having experienced so much good fortune of our own over the years, giving back is a rewarding way to help others. One area Liberty Power is very passionate about is preparing our youth for the challenges and opportunities of the future, which is why we created the Liberty Power Bright Horizons Scholarship in 2013. Through this alliance with the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (USHCC) and the USHCC Foundation, Liberty Power has committed to providing $100,000 in college scholarships over a span of five years, with a focus on rewarding students studying STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics).
As one of the most successful Hispanic entrepreneurs in the country, what advice can you share with other entrepreneurs?
Two keys to success that I’d like to share include: Do something you are passionate about. The most successful people in life are simply following their passions. Secondly, make sure you have the right people on your team. At Liberty Power we look for people that are humble, hungry, smart, and share the company’s vision.

Al pan, pan y al Sixto, Sixto

Franklin Park.-

El creador de las panaderias Arecely’s, y recientemente acreedor del Premio Buen Vecino por su proverbial generosidad,  comparte las delicias de su exito.

 Por Víctor R. Pérez  

ugliLa insolita historia empresarial que ha llevado a la existencia de cinco panaderias Aracely’s comenzo en abril de 1984, cuando Sixto Rincon abrio el primer establecimiento en el sur de Chicago, en West Lawn en 68th St. y Western Ave bajo el nombre de Aracelys.

Seis años después, abrió su segunda panadería en Franklin Park, y le puso el mismo nombre, Aracely’s

“Le puse ese nombre a mi primera panadería porque cuando la abrí solo tenía una hija: Aracely”, recuerda don Sixto. “Mi hija es una de las cosas más marivillosas que Dios me ha dado”.

“Así que pensé: si tengo más hijos espero que no se encelen por eso; y también pensé:  cuando Aracely se case, espero que su esposo no vaya a pensar: ‘Me voy a llevar a la hija y de paso la panadería’”, dice en tono jocoso

En 1992, don Sixto cerró la panadería de West Lawn.  “Los tiempos cambiaron. Y el barrio cambió de demografía. y las ventas ya no fueron las mismas”, agrega.   Un ano despues vio la oportunidad en Cicero y abrio alli otra panaderia bajo el mismo nombre.

Hoy  Sixto no solo está al frente de sus dos panaderías,  sino también ayuda a “correr” otras tres: la de su hija Aracely, en La Grande, y las de sus hermanos Felipe Rincon, en Villa Park , e Irasema Pérez, en Melrose Park.

“Todos nos ayudamos. Si hace falta un panadero en la panadería de uno de mis hermanos, le envío uno”, dijo.

Las cinco panaderías somos Aracely’s”. Comparten nombre y espacios publicitarios porque “somos como una corporación”, explica Rincón. En total, las  panaderías Aracely’s cuentan con cerca de 50 empleados.

No obstante el éxito económico de sus panadería, Rincon asegura que la educación es la mejor herencia que puede dejarles a sus hijos.

“A mis hijos yo les enseñé a ser independientes, a valorar el trabajo. Aquí todos trabajamos”, dice Rincón. “Ahora sólo le pido a Dios que salgan adelante”.

“También les enseñé desde pequeños a respetar a los demás, a ser humildes, y sobre todo a nunca olvidarse de sus raíces”, subraya.“Y no hay que olvidarse de ayudar a nuestra comunidad”.

El filantropico

Que la Cámara Baja de Illinois a través de la representante estatal, haya entregado recientemente a la panadería Aracely’s de Franklin Park el premio mensual Buen Vecino no responde a una casualidad.

Rincón, propietario  recibió esta distinción en reconocimiento a sus “generosas donaciones a ancianos, estudiantes universitarios y organizaciones sin fines de lucro en necesidad” en dicho distrito que incluye Franklin Park y Melrose Park, lee el certificado firmado por Michael Madigan, presidente de la Cámara de Baja.

Las panaderías Aracely’s de Rincón son líderes en el ramo gracias a su concha blanca, la cual se ha convertido en la pieza de pan dulce más codiciada por los paladares de Franklin Park y Cicero.

“Diosito nos mandó a todos  a este mundo con un misión; y la nuestra es servir”, dice Rincón, de 52 años, sobre el reconocimiento. El premio, a propuesta de la representante estatal Kathleen Willis(D-77). “Me siento afortunado de servir a la comunidad al poder regresar algo de mi trabajo”.

¿Pero cuál ha sido la clave del éxito de este hombre de padres mexicanos en Chicago y criado en el barrio Back of the Yards?

“Es la calidad del pan mexicano y de nuestra repostería”, asegura.. “La calidad hace que la gente nos prefiera a nosotros que a otras”, senalo.

La innovación también ha sido clave en la fórmula del éxito. Desde 2009, Aracely’s empezó a vender tortas (sándwiches a la mexicana).

“La gente nos ha respondido muy bien, sobre todo con la torta de jamón y queso de puerco. Nuestros clientes la piden mucho”, dice don Sixto. “Las panaderías ahora son com un ‘Subway mexicano’”.

Aracely’s se anotó otro triunfo al ganar el primer lugar en el concurso de tamales en la Feria del Tamal en Pilsen en 2011 y 2012.

Imposible sin Maria Guadalupe

Pero Rincón reconoce que este éxito empresarial  hubiera sido imposible sin su esposa María Guadalupe, originaria de Aguascalientes, México, y con quien está casado desde 1981.

“Sin ella  yo no sería nada”, dice don Sixto. “Ella ha sido una gran compañera en casa y en la panadería. Me ha ayudado en todo: lo mismo como cajera, contadora que atendiendo a los clientes”.

Los Rincón procrearon tres hijos: Aracely, de 30 años, quien se tituló de contadura de DePaul University;  Jacqueline, de 25, enfermera registrada y quien estudia un posgrado; y Ricardo, de 23 años, recién graduado de arquitecto de la Universidad de Illinois en Chicago.

“Me considero afortunado de haberles dado una educación a todos ellos gracias al negocio de la panadería”, apunto Ricon

A través de organizaciones sin ánimos de lucro como Club de Leones Azteca y la Fundación Necahual, Sixto ayuda a organizar bailes y rifas para recaudar fondos para las personas que necesitan anteojos y también para becas para estudiantes latinos.

“Yo entiendo a los padres porque a mí me costo mucho esfuerzo y dinero pagarles la educación a mis hijos. Pero fue un esfuerzo que valió la pena”, dice.

“A los padres, yo les digo: Ayuden a sus hijos con todo lo que tienen a su disposición. La educación es la única forma para que nuestra comunidad pueda superarse”, agrega.

 

Zapatero a su zapato

¿Pensó usted algún día cruzar la frontera para llegar a Estados Unidos y ser zapatero?
A Juan Manuel García la pregunta no le atormenta. Es más, lo hace con pasión y a mucha  honra. Lo aprendió de su padre cuando era muy jovencito en su natal Zacatecas, y no sospechaba entonces que hoy le serviría para el sustento de su familia en un país donde la reparación de calzados suena como un oficio del otro mundo.
Llegó en 1996  a La Villita siguiendo los pasos de su padre, quien se asentó en el barrio 30 años atrás, y lo primero que hizo fue abrir una zapatería.
Ya retirado, el zapatero mayor regresó a Zacatecas y visita Chicago de manera esporádica. Su hijo siguió la tradición.
“Somos una familia de zapateros.  Tengo otros dos hermanos que también conocen el oficio. Yo empecé a trabajar con mi Papá en su zapatería en Chicago hasta que decidí abrir mi propio negocio.  Nos gustó aquí porque la gente está dispuesta a reparar zapatos”, dijo García desde su diminuto local, en el 2550 S. Keller, casi esquina con la calle 26 St.
Contrario a lo que muchos pudieran suponer, la zapatería en la primera economía mundial, abarrotada con tiendas de calzados de todo tipo y una amplia variedad de precio,  tiene una buena demanda. Al menos en La Villita.
“Yo no paro de trabajar.  Estoy aquí de lunes a sábado, y hay muchos clientes que me piden trabajar los domingos, pero tengo que descansar al menos un día. Solo trabajo los domingos cuando tengo algo muy urgente. Muchos piensan que esto es un trabajo de ‘Part Time’, pero no, es de Tiempo Completo”, apuntó.
El hecho de que por casi dos décadas Juan Manuel García haya conservado una clientela fiel, obedece al viejo refrán de zapatero a su zapato.
“Yo sé hacer mi trabajo con calidad, por eso es que siempre tengo clientes. No me gasto nada en publicidad. La gente vienen recomendadas por otro”, asegura.  Puedes encontrarte a una persona que quiera hacer un oficio por el simple hecho de tener dinero.  No solo hay que tener los conocimientos, ser zapateros es duro, es constante, nunca tienes vacaciones, y pasas muchas horas aquí encerrado”, dijo este padre de tres hijos.
Esa historia es, digamos, la suela del zapato.  Pero Juan también le brillan los ojos cuando habla dacerca de lo que le apasiona de su oficio.
“Alguna gente piensa que esto es como una rutina. No es así. Prácticamente en cada reparación de zapato, hay algo diferente que hacer, y tienes que ser creativo para hacer un buen trabajo.  También esto me recuerda a México, a nuestr tierra…mucha gente entra aquí, y expresan lo mismo”.
Y a juzgar por sus palabras, Juan estaría con martillo y puntilla en mano, o cortando y pegando suela, por mucho tiempo.
“Las zapaterías no van a desaparecer. Siempre ha habido una necesidad de reparar zapatos.  Incluso, cuando la economía no está buena, muchos vienen con botas compradas años atrás para que se las repare. Y te dicen: ahora no es tiempo de comprar zapato nuevo”.

 

Karma Yacht Sales: Dos socios a toda vela

Karma Yacht Sales, LLC

 Dicen por ahí que cuando uno se monta en el barco de la vida, nunca sabe hacia dónde te lleva el viento.

 Pregunten a Lou Sandoval.  Aprendió a navegar en barcos de velas a la edad de los 10 años y, hoy es el co-dueño de una renombrada empresa de ventas de yates que fundó con un socio, Jack Buoscio, en el 2002.

   Pero el éxito de Karma Yacht Sales, LLC, como se llama la compañía, no obedece solo a la fuerza del viento de la vida, sino básicamente a la visión y experiencia de sus timoneles.

    Antes de convertirse en un “dealer” de yates, Sandoval construyó el cimiento de lo que sería el futuro empresario.

 “ Iba a estudiar medicina, pero terminé estudiando bioquímica”, comentó.

 Al terminar su carrera, comenzó  “un entrenamiento mundial” en diferentes áreas de gerencia con ABT Laboratories, que lo llevó a Alemania, Japón, Puerto Rico, y, entre  otras ciudades, a Seattle. En este último lugar resurgió la pasión por los yates.

  “En Seattle, me di cuenta que tenía suficiente tiempo libre y me puse a cuidar yates, y así tener ingresos extras.  Le propuse a alguien que le cuidaría su yate, y llegué a tener 6 clientes”, dijo.

Sandoval estaba feliz deleitando su afición, cuando la empresa de Laboratorios lo envió a Miami, con una responsabilidad gerencial mucho mayor.

 Pero el destino ya estaba echado. “En Miami,alguien me contactó para hacer lo mismo por recomendación de uno de mis antiguos clientes en Seattle y no pude resistir la tentación”, apuntó.

  Ya no tenía dudas que quería montarse en un yate para manejar su vida.  Dejó la industria de laboratorio, un trabajo en el que pudo haber estado toda su vida ,y regresó a Chicago para probar suerte como empresario.

  Llegó entonces con 16 años de experiencia corporativa en ventas, administración de ventas, mercadeo y administración de productos, cualidades adquiridas en su preparación en la industria de biotecnología y farmacéutica.

 Lo primero fue unir recursos con su hermano y dos amigos para comprar un barco de vela en el 2000 de Beneteau, el famoso  comerciante (dealer) de yates, en otro tiempo llamado Darfin Yachts, Ltd. Luego se enteró de que los dueños estaban vendiendo la empresa.

 Para entonces ya conocía a Buoscio y entre ambos compraron el negocio de Beneteau, que lo han llevado a un crecimiento sorprendente.

 “Hemos tenido éxito en tomar una marca establecida en el Lago Michigan (Beneteau Sailing Yachts) e incrementar el mercado con nuevos botes con una venta de 34 por ciento más en los últimos 10 años.  El logro ha sido porque modernizamos el proceso de negocios y nos enfocamos en el servicio al consumidor”, explicó.

Hoy Beneteau  es el fabricante número uno de yates en el mundo en los tamaños de 30 a 57 pies.  Como un “Dealer Platinum”, Karma Yacht Sales está en el ranking de los primeros tres dealers de yates en Norteamérica.  En el 2011 KYS premio a la empresa con el Dealer de Servicio del Año”.

  Aunque sube de un yate a otro, a Sandoval no lo marea el éxito y busca apoyar a su comunidad, entre otras cosas porque es de la creencia de que “si tratas a la gente bien, esto se te regresa en prosperidad y fortuna”.

El touchdown de Mauricio Sánchez

Serie del Especial de “Partnership”

Por Víctor R. Pérez

CHICAGO — Tan en serio se tomó Mauricio Sánchez su vida en el terreno
de los negocios que escogió como socio a un hombre fuerte: Ron Rivera,
un linebacker retirado de los Osos de Chicago con anillo de campeón
del Super Bowl XX.

En 1995 ambos fundaron Sanchez & Rivera Title, la primera empresa
hispana del sector de títulos de propiedad a nivel nacional.

En aquel entonces Sánchez era un recién egresado de Loyola University
donde estudió negocios internacionales y ciencias políticas, mientras
que Rivera era famoso por haber jugado como defensor de los Osos que
vencieron 46-10 a los Patriotas de Nueva Inglaterra para alzarse
campeones de la NFL en enero de 1986.

Ese partido sólo refirmó que los Osos tenían la mejor defensa de la
NFL. Apenas perdieron uno de sus 16 juegos de aquella temporada
regular.

En el terreno de los negocios, Rivera también fue un acorazado al
abrir puertas con su nombre para que Sanchez & Rivera se consolidara
como una exitosa empresa aseguradora de títulos.

Pero en 2000, Rivera decide dejar Sanchez & Rivera para probar suerte
como entrenador de linebackers de las Águilas de Filadelfia.

Contrario a las empresas que cambian de nombre cuando sus socios se
separan, Sanchez & Rivera conservó el suyo y siguió creciendo.

“Debido a la estrecha relación y orgullo que sentimos por la empresa,
Ron y yo acordamos seguir usando el nombre de él para la empresa,
mientras él iniciaba su carrera de entrenador”, dijo Sánchez a
Negocios Now.

Actualmente, Sánchez, de 42 años, es el presidente y CEO de Sanchez &
Rivera Title. Rivera, de 51 años, es el entrenador en jefe de las
Panteras de Carolina desde 2011.

Sanchez & Rivera empezó a operar en Chicago Sanchez & Rivera con el
objetivo de asegurar de que todas las partes involucradas en una
transacción tomen la mejor decisión a la hora de comprar una
propiedad.

“Nosotros fuimos pioneros en bienes raíces en ofrecer a la comunidad
latina la oportunidad de educarse para comprar una propiedad para
vivir”, dice Sánchez, oriundo de Toluca, Estado de México.

En la actualidad, Sanchez & Rivera ostenta una cartera de clientes que
incluye empresas Forbes 500 a lo largo y ancho de EEUU, y allende la
frontera sur. Este año, ayudó a concretar su primera transacción
inmobiliaria y multimillonaria en el área de la Ciudad de México.

“Nos encargamos de facilitar de manera libre, integral y clara el
proceso de compra”, explica Sánchez, “desde el inicio hasta el cierre
de la transacción”.

LA IMPORTANCIA DE UN NOMBRE

Sánchez conoció a Rivera a través de Manny Sánchez, tío de aquel y
amigo de este.

“Ron y yo nos dimos cuenta que había un vacío para una empresa como
esta dentro de la comunidad latina, que educara a la comunidad
latina”, señala Sánchez.

Para Sánchez fue importante el reconocimiento del nombre de Rivera,
pero no determinante para asociarse con el nativo de Fort Ord,
California, en un negocio de los títulos de propiedad.

“Más que tener un nombre famoso, es muy importante conocer el negocio.
Y Ron lo conocía y lo entendía muy bien”, explica Sánchez.

En los primeros cinco años de su fundación, Sanchez & Rivera Title
creció a un ritmo de 15 a 20 por ciento anual.

Con la llegada del 2000 el mercado inmobiliario empezó a cobrar auge y
entonces la empresa creció a un ritmo anual de 20 a 30 por ciento
anual, lo cual es “lo tradicional”, explica Sánchez.

“En ese punto empezamos a tener presencia en otras partes de Estados
Unidos”, dice.

Hacia 2000, Rivera empezó a retirarse poco a poco de la empresa y a
acercase de nuevo a la NFL hasta marcharse a Filadelfia.

En palabras de Sánchez, la relación que Rivera y él tienen va más allá
de los negocios.

“El es el padrino de mi hijo, Domingo”, dijo. “Ron es prácticamente familia”.

“Así que para mí verlo de coach en la NFL es como ver a un hermano mío
realizar su sueño; y para él verme al frente de Sanchez & Rivera es
ver a su hermano ayudando a educar a nuestra gente en bienes raíces.
Fue algo muy natural”.

LECCIONES DE LA CRISIS HIPOTECARIA

Luego llegó la crisis hipotecaria de 2008 y el mercado se desplomó.

“Nosotros sobrevivimos el desplome del mercado debido a que
identificamos a la gente buena con quien trabajar”, recuerda Sánchez.

En un mercado donde abundaban las prácticas predatorias, Sanchez &
Rivera sorteó la crisis con la “incredulidad intacta”, asegura.

“Estabamos en una posición única: entendíamos el mercado y entendíamos
a nuestra comunidad”, añade. “Nuestra reputación creció”.

Como parte de sus esfuerzos para educar a la comunidad latina, Sánchez
unió fuerzas con Phillip Krawiec para fundar el Information Institute
For Answer and Advocacy In Real Estate (o Instituto de Información de
Respuesta y Defensa en Bienes Raíces).

“Queremos procurar la sostenibilidad de ser propietario de casa”, dice
Sánchez sobre la fundación cuyo portal estará operando para finales de
año.

Rivera también ha sorteado su propios retos desde que se convirtió en
el cuarto entrenador en jefe de las Panteras de Carolina en los 18
años de la franquicia.

En 2010, antes de la llegada de Rivera, las Panteras habían tenido su
segunda peor temporada jamás: 2 victorias y 14 derrotas, y la peor
ofensiva de la NFL.

Con Rivera, las Panteras terminaron las siguentes dos temporadas con
mejor récord: 6-10 en 2011 y 7-9 en 2012.

Pero, ¿volverá algún día Rivera a Sanchez & Rivera?

“Creo que él nunca va a volver. Su actual carrera de entrenador, es
una carrera de por vida”, dice Sánchez.

“Ambos tenemos gratos recuerdos y el enorme orgullo de haber cimentado
esta empresa”, concluye.

La Dulce Vida de Gregorio y Jorge

En solo tres años, La Dulce Vida a punto de referencia para  este suburbio “hispano”.

Por Esteban Montero

El gusto  de Gregorio por los postres y los helados pudiera ser la causa de que hoy su negocio, La Dulce Vida Nevería, sea un sitio de referencia para los hispanos de Melrose Park.

Lo fundó hace tres años junto con su socio Jorge Galván y hoy nadie duda  en ese suburbio ubicado al oeste de la ciudad que se trata de un indiscutible éxito empresarial.

“Desde niño me gustaron los postres, el dulce, el  helado y los jugos, y cuando decidí abrir un negocio, ya tenía la idea, hablé con mi socio y hoy tenemos”.

La Dulce Vida  es un concepto de nevería mexicana que vende una combinación de jugos naturales, helados y antojitos, que los clientes pueden llevar a casa o deleitar en el propio establecimiento.

A los jóvenes empresarios les costó un poco llegar a este concepto.  Nacidos en Acapulco y Zacatecas, respectivamente, Gregorio y Jorge se mudaron de Chicago para Melrose Park en el 2005 y abrieron el negocio seis años después rodeado de mucha incertidumbre.

“También nos enfrentamos al temor de no poder crecer, saber si vamos a encontrar financiamiento en no, al final, gracias a Dios, todo a ha salido bien.  Y a mi modo de ver, han sido tres cosas: la calidad, el precio asequible de mis productos y el servicio”.

Conectado con la comunidad

Pero quizás esté influyendo un ingrediente adicional: su conexión con la comunidad.

“Hemos apoyado a niños en escuelas públicas, a equipos de futbol, y a vecinos de la comunidad, haciendo donativos a iglesias u organizaciones como Casa Jalisco.  Creo que uno debe regresar a la comunidad, lo que ella hace por ti”, dijo Gregorio de 30 años.

En su opinión, todo lo anterior combinado es la razón de que su negocio esté “comúnmente lleno” de gente que vienen “a vivir una experiencia”, a pesar de que establecerse una competencia muy cerca de la Dulce Vida.

“Creo que fuimos la inspiración para otros (negocios). Pero la verdad que eso no nos incomoda, la gente sigue viniendo a nuestro negocio, latinos y no latinos”, mientras uno de sus trabajadores atendía a una cliente afroamericana.

En la carta de la Nevería se encuentra helados tradicionales mexicanos, como el Gansito, de tequila con almendra y de rompope, por solo mencionar algunos, pero también jugos de frutas diversos, que combinan a solicitud del cliente.  Y como la gente quiere comer rico –dice- también damos antojitos.

Ya probado como un concepto viable “donde quiera que haya una comunidad latina”, los dueños de la Dulce Vida, piensan en grande.

“Queremos crecer, expandirnos y, eventualmente, vender una franquicia”, dijo Gregorio, quien aprovecha las redes sociales para  llevar el sabor de un negocio que le roba un poco de sueño.

“Abrimos a las 6:00 am. La gente compra jugo muy temprano para dárselo a sus hijos para la escuela, para tomar mientras hacen ejercicios. Yo disfruto que compartan mi pasión”, afirmó.

Melrose Park

Población total: 25,557    Hispanos: 17,766    69.6 %  Total de negocios:  450 Hispanos: No hay datos

Fuente:  Buró del Censo, 2007

Luis Gutierrez: A guiding light for Latino progress

Luis Gutiérrez is a name shared name by two prominent local figures in the pro-immigrant movement: Congressman Luis Gutiérrez (D – Illinois) and the Mexican community activist and educator José Luis Gutiérrez.

However, our Luis Gutiérrez does not plan on changing his name.

“Don’t get confused. I’m the younger one; I’m 40,” he says with a laugh. “Each has his own area to develop his talent, and mine is definitely not politics.”

Nonprofit organizations are the specialty for this Chicagoan, born and raised in Little Village (La Villita).

In 1997, when he was just 24 years old, Gutiérrez founded Latinos Progresando, which helps Latino immigrants navigate the complexities of the U.S. immigration system. Nearly 16 years later, it holds the distinction of being, the largest family-based immigration legal services agency led by Latino in the State of Illinois, Gutiérrez says.

“We help all people equally, be it a Mexican seeking U.S. citizenship, a Guatemalan filing an immigrant petition with United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) so that his or her mother can come from Guatemala to the United States, or a young person filing a Deferred Action request,” Gutiérrez explains.

Latinos Progresando also offers university scholarships for Undocumented students, and there is even a theatre company where young people can “share their immigrant experiences,” he adds.

Furthermore, Gutiérrez brought together 15 nonprofit organizations under a group called the Marshall Square Resource Network. “We meet once a month to discuss issues that affect the community and to grow as organizations,” says Gutiérrez of the network, established in 2010.

Illinois General Assembly Rep. Silvana Tabares (D – 21st District) and Chicago Alderman George Cárdenas (D – 12th Ward) both have met with the network “in order to inform us about how we, as organizations, can work with the support of their offices,” Gutiérrez explains.

The origins of Gutiérrez’s involvement in community service trace back to the early 1990s, when a friend invited him to volunteer at a citizenship workshop in Piotrowski Park.

“I was surprised to see so many youth volunteers helping older people fill out citizenship applications,” Gutiérrez says. “Those adults reminded me of my own parents. It made me happy; it opened up my heart.”

Originally from Mexico, Gutiérrez’s parents taught him lessons that go beyond his degree in nonprofit management from DePaul University. “They taught me to respect and help other people, just as other people helped them when they first arrived in the United States,” he says.

Their teachings – and his visit to Piotrowski Park – prompted him to quit his job as a Burger King manager and launch Latinos Progresando. He quickly learned the challenges inherent in running a non profit organization.

“It isn’t just about motivating your team, but rather it’s more about making your organization grow through donations. It’s very difficult,” he says.

However, Gutiérrez says he has been fortunate in his drive to keep Latinos Progresando and its mission intact.

“I have always heard other people say, ‘People don’t give.’ That has never been my experience. There has always been someone willing to help us out, either as a volunteer or through a donation,” Gutiérrez says.

Last January, the foundation celebrated its 15th year.

“Latinos Progresando would never have reached 15 years without the support of its volunteers, of educational institutes, and of the African American and white communities as well,” Gutiérrez says. “We are the reflection of the efforts of a united Chicago.”

Much like Gutiérrez and Latinos Progresando helps Latinos in need of legal services; ComEd is dedicated to helping its customers during financial hardships. That’s why, through the ComEd CARE programs, we offer a range of financial assistance programs to help qualified customers with paying their electric bills, and we support energy-assistance programs that help those in need.

Una luz del progreso latino

Luis Gutiérrez es tocayo de dos personajes locales del movimiento pro inmigrante: el congresista Luis Gutiérrez (D-Illinois) y el activista mexicano José Luis Gutiérrez.

Pero nuestro Luis Gutiérrez no piensa cambiarse el nombre.

“No se confundan: Yo soy el más joven; tengo 40 años”, dice en son de broma. “Cada quien tiene su espacio para desarrollar su talento, y el mío definitivamente no es la política”.

El espacio de este oriundo de Chicago criado en La Villita son las organizaciones sin ánimo de lucro.

En 1997, con sólo 24 años, gestó Latinos Progresando. En 1998 esta agrupación empezó a ayudar a los inmigrantes hispanos a navegar por el sistema migratorio de EEUU.

Quince años después, esta organización ubicada en el 3047 W. Cermark Rd.  que encabezada Gutiérrez ofrece servicio legal familiar.

“Ayudamos igual a un mexicano a solicitar su ciudadanía estadounidense, que a un guatemalteco a presentar una petición ante Inmigración para traer a su mamá de Guatemala a Estados Unidos, y a un joven a solicitar la Acción Diferida”, explica Gutiérrez.

Latinos Progresando también ofrece becas universitarias para jóvenes indocumentados, y un taller de teatro donde los jóvenes pueden “compartir sus experiencias inmigrantes”.

Además, Gutiérrez ha logrado aglutinar a 15 organizaciones sin ánimos de lucro bajo la red de apoyo Marshall Square Resource Network.

“Nos reunimos una vez al mes para hablar sobre los temas que nos afectan como comunidad y también para crecer como organizaciones”, dice Gutiérrez sobre la red formada en 2010.

En ese sentido, United Way les asesoró para recaudar más donaciones individuales, señala Gutiérrez.

La representante estatal Silvana Tabares (D-Distrito 21) y el concejal George Cárdenas (Distrito 12) se han reunido con la red “para informarnos sobre cómo nosotros, como organizaciones, podemos trabajar con las oficinas de ellos”, explica Gutiérrez.

La filantropía de Gutiérrez empezó a principio de los noventa, cuando un amigo lo invitó a participar como voluntario en un taller de ciudadanía en Piotrowski Park.

“Me sorprendió ver a tantos jóvenes voluntarios ayudando a llenar las solicitudes de ciudadanía a personas adultas”, dice Gutiérrez, “Esas personas adultas me recordaron a mis propios padres”.

“Eso me dió alegría… se me abrió el corazón”, agregó.

Originarios de México, los padres de Gutiérrez le dieron más que una educación  en administración de organizaciones sin fines de lucro en DePaul University. “Me enseñaron a respetar y a ayudar a los demás, como otras personas los ayudaron a ellos cuando llegaron a este país”, dice.

Eso, y aquella visita a Piotrowski Park, lo hicieron dejar su puesto de gerente en un Burger King para formar Latinos Progresando.

Pero en Latinos Progresando se dio cuenta que es un reto dirigir una fundación.

“No sólo se trata de darle ánimo a tu equipo de trabajo, sino además de hacer crecer a tu organización a base de donaciones. Eso es muy difícil”, recuerda.

Pero se dice bastante afortunado.

“Siempre he escuchado a otros decir, ‘La gente no da’. Esa jamás ha sido mi experiencia. Siempre ha habido alguien dispuesto a darnos la mano, como voluntario o con una donación”, dice.

En enero pasado, la fundación cumplió 15 años.

“Latinos Progresando no hubiera llegado a los 15 años de vida sin la ayuda de los voluntarios, de instituciones educativas, de la comunidad afroamericana y también de la blanca”, dijo Gutiérrez. “Somos el reflejo del esfuerzo de un Chicago unido”.

Así como Luis Gutiérrez y Latinos Progresando ayuda a los latinos con servicios legales, ComEd está comprometida a ayudar a sus clientes durante en dificultades financieras. Es por eso que mediante los programas ComEd CARE, ofrecemos un rango de programas de asistencia financiera para ayudar a clientes calificados con el pago de sus cuentas de electricidad y los apoyamos con programas de asistencia deenergía que los ayuda en esa necesidad.

Prado & Rentería: una amistad que cuenta

Más que una amistad, María Prado e Hilda Rentería tejieron una fuerte amistad de negocio con un sello único en el emprendedor Chicago latino.


Por Víctor R. Pérez

 

CHICAGO — Cuando María Prado e Hilda Rentería se asociaron para montar una firma de contadores certificados, su primer cliente fue el Distrito de Parques de Chicago.

 

Pero después esa auditoría de mes y medio en 1990, lograda gracias a un contrato para minorías, Prado & Rentería (P&R) tenía cero clientes.

 

“Nos preguntamos, ‘¿Y ahora qué? ¿Qué vamos a hacer?’”, recuerda María. “La respuesta fue: hay que hacer planes de marketing”.

 

Eso significó elaborar presupuestos, hacer llamadas, sostener reuniones. “Jamás estudié marketing en la universidad”, confiesa María. “Esa fue mi primera clase de marketing”.

 

Ese “qué vamos a hacer” ante aquel primer reto de hace 23 años hasta el más reciente, ha convertido a P&R en la firma de contadores certificados hispana más grande de Illinois.

 

“Algo que definitivamente nos ha ayudado es intentar cosas nuevas. Si algo no está funcionando, nosotros no buscamos culpables; buscamos soluciones”, dice María.

 

P&R cuenta ahora con un personal de 20 miembros, tiene clientes como organizaciones no lucrativas, agencias gubernamentales y grandes corporaciones; y ha formado a profesionales que ahora ocupan puestos claves en el sector público.

 

La firma empezó con tan solo “una persona y media”.

 

“Yo estaba (trabajando) a tiempo completo, y sin sueldo”, dice María, sentada junto a Hilda, en la sala de juntas de P&R en el 1837 S. Michigan Ave.

 

“Y yo estaba a medio tiempo, con sueldo… pero de otro empleo”, dice entre risas Hilda, aclarando que en ese momento ella trabajaba a tiempo parcial en First National Bank of Chicago.

 

El buen humor y la tenacidad de las socias armonizan con la decoración de la oficina de P&R cuyas paredes lucen un calendario azteca, cuadritos de típicas plazas de la provincia mexicana, alcatraces y tonos de amarillo como sacados de un cuadro de Diego Rivera.

 

Estos detalles parecieran contar la historia de la amistad y la sociedad entre Prado y Rentería, quienes se conocieron a mediados de los ochenta cuando estudiaban contabilidad en la Universidad de Illinois en Chicago (UIC).

 

“Teníamos clases juntas y estudiábamos juntas en la biblioteca”, recuerda Hilda.

 

Pero las coincidencias rebasaban el campus universitario.

 

“Las dos habíamos llegado de México; las dos hablamos español; las dos entendíamos la cultura mexicana. Todo eso nos identificó”, explica Hilda, quien a los 16 años emigró con sus padres de Ocotlán, Jalisco, a La Villita.

 

Lo anterior la convirtió en vecina de María, quien vivía en Pilsen tras llegar a Chicago a los 12 años procedente de Jaripo, Michoacán.

 

Durante su época de estudiantes, María e Hilda también viajaban en grupo a destinos mexicanos. Estos viajes resultaron reveladores.

En una de esos travesías a Puerto Vallarta, Hilda descubrió cuán intrépida podía ser su amiga. “Descubrí el espíritu aventurero de María. Si alguien del grupo sugería hacer algo atrevido, ella era la primera en querer hacerlo”, dice Hilda con una sonrisa pero sin entrar en detalles.

 

En otro viaje que hicieron a Ocotlán, María se percató “del gran aprecio entre Hilda y sus abuelos” maternos. ‘Descubrí la conexión tan fuerte que ella (Hilda) tenía con sus abuelos”, recuerda María, visiblemente conmovida.

 

EL PASO POR FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF CHICAGO

 

Al egresar de UIC en 1987, dio la casualidad de que ambas empezaron a trabajar en el mismo banco.

 

María e Hilda eran las dos únicas latinas entre las 100 personas que trabajaban en el Departamento de Auditorías Internas del First National Bank of Chicago.

 

“Haber sido contratadas fue algo muy grande. Los demás compañeros en ese departamento eran en su mayoría blancos, y había algunos afroamericanos”, rememora María sobre el banco de las calles Dearborn y Monroe, y que ahora es propiedad de Chase.

Ambas estuvieron entre las 30 personas que First National contrató en 1987. Al cabo de un año, el banco reconoció a sólo cuatro personas de ese grupo — Prado y Rentería fueron dos de ellas.

 

CÓMO SURGIÓ PRADO & RENTERIA

 

Fiel a su espíritu aventurero, María aceptó el reto de empezar su propia firma de contadores certificados tan pronto como se le presentó la oportunidad en 1990.

 

Atribuye esta oportunidad a Carolina Sánchez Crozier, propietaria una consultora de computación. Sánchez Crozier quería apoyar la firma de contadores pero sin descuidar su consultora.

 

“Fue ella quien identificó la oportunidad de un contrato con el Distrito de Parques de Chicago”, dijo María.

 

Y para esta aventura  Prado pensó en Rentería, quien aún trabajaba en First National Bank of Chicago.

 

“Me atrajo la idea de hacer algo difícil. Yo llevaba tres años en el banco y no tenía compromisos económicos grandes. Así que acepté”, explica Hilda.

 

Luego del Distrito de Parques, instrumentaron el plan de marketing para atraer a clientes.

 

“No fue fácil. El proceso fue muy despacio. Parecía que los contratos no iban a llegar nunca”, recuerda Hilda.

 

La gran oportunidad llegó a través de Arthur Andersen, entonces una de las cinco firmas de contadores más importantes de EEUU.

 

“Ellos nos dieron la oportunidad de probarnos con un subcontrato de dos semanas para una hacer auditoría en las Escuelas Públicas de Chicago (CPS)”, dice María.  Superaron la prueba con creces.

 

“Arthur Andersen nos ayudó bastante. Nos dieron subcontratos y nos apoyaron con referencias”, dice María.

 

Pero mientras Arthur Andersen cayó en desgracia tras el escándalo Enron de 2001, P&R se consolidó en el ramo. Ahora los proyectos que P&R por lo general acepta son contratos para hacer auditorias que duran un promedio de uno o dos meses, explica Hilda.

 

“La clave del éxito es la credibilidad”, asegura Hilda. “Hay que tener un sentido de calidad profesional y tener en cuenta las necesidades del cliente”.

 

PROGRAMA DE DESARROLLO

 

Para ayudar a que funcione el negocio de sus clientes, P&R recién ha instrumentado un programa de desarrollo para preparar a su personal en áreas técnicas y no técnicas.

 

“El programa es más bien holístico”, explica Hilda. “Tomamos en cuenta el desarrollo profesional y personal de nuestros auditores”.

 

“El programa surgió cuando platicábamos con los mánagers sobre el desempeño de los auditores. Veíamos las limitaciones pero sin hablar de la experiencia (personal) de la persona evaluada”, prosigue. “O sea, ¿qué sabemos de este auditor que le impide alcanzar sus metas profesionales?”

 

De acuerdo con Prado, el programa se enfoca en la persona, quien cuenta con un mentor en su mánager para concretar sus objetivos profesionales y personales.

 

“Les estamos ofreciendo un espacio a nuestro personal para relacionarnos mejor, para conseguir un desempeño más efectivo, para rendir frutos”, dice Hilda.

 

María se apresura a aclarar que con este programa, “elevamos al personal al mismo nivel que el cliente. El cliente y el personal son primero”.

 

PROYECTO JUBILACIÓN ‘ADELANTADA’

 

A sus respectivos 49 y 50 años, Prado y Rentería ya están planeando su jubilación “adelantada”.

 

“Queremos que la firma siga creciendo con las nuevas generaciones”, dice María. “Ya estamos preparando a quienes eventualmente tomarán las riendas, ¡pues ya nos tardamos en jubilar!”, dice soltando sonora carcajada.

 

Y mientras el retiro llega, Hilda sigue compartiendo la tenacidad de su socia como el primer día: “Nuestra meta ha sido sostener la firma, y yo sé que María está 100 por ciento enfocada en eso, al igual que yo”.

 

Juntas en la vida y en el negocio

Primero trabajo una y ayudó a la otra con los estudios. Luego intercambiaron los papeles. Entre las dos ahorraron y adquirieron Spa Holistic Azul.

 

Por Jackelin Camacho-Ruiz

 

Ambas crecieron en un ambiente holístico en su natal San Luis de Potosí, el tiempo pasó, juntas emigraron en busca de nuevos horizontes y ya asentadas aquí, pensaron en qué tipo en abrir su propia empresa: la idea parece haber llegado de manera natural.

 

“En casa, nuestra madre y nuestra abuela nos daban hierbas, tés, y curábamos nuestros cuerpos de forma naturista.  Llegamos aquí a los Estados Unidos y nos dimos cuenta de que podríamos formar nuestra propia empresa  aportando lo mucho que sabíamos, pues es la forma en que crecimos y la forma que sabemos hacerlo” afirmó Martha.

 

Ubicada en el 842 de la W. Adams St., en Chicago,  Spa Holistic Azul es una suntuosa empapada de refugio que ofrece  servicios de masaje y cuidado de la piel en el centro de Chicago.

Trabajando incontables horas para llegar a su empresa a la cima del éxito de su empresa, las gemelas potosinas, son parte de un segmento de mujeres latinas dueñas de negocio de rápido crecimiento en todo el país, cambiando el rostro de la iniciativa empresarial.

De acuerdo con la más reciente encuesta realizada por la Fundación Nacional de Mujeres Propietarias de Negocios, las empresas de propiedad latina, han aumentado en un 206 por ciento entre 1987 y 1996..

 

“Creemos que más latinas se están convirtiendo en empresarias porque están siendo más independientes. La dependencia económica de los hombres, no solo registra un decrecimiento en las comunidades hispanas, sino que las mujeres están obteniendo una educación superior, dijo.

 

“Estamos muy orgullosas de ser parte de este creciente número de empresarias latinas. Sólo queremos seguir estudiando y llegar a ser más independientes a través de nuestra educación. La forma en que se vive hoy es diferente: la idea de muchas mujeres latinas que emigraban a este país,  de pensar en casarse joven y tener una familia numerosa, ya  es parte del pasado “.

 

De 30 años de edad, las hermanas Romero crecieron en San Luis Potosí, México, y emigraron a Estados Unidos al cumplir  24 años.  Son las más pequeñas de una familia compuesta por ocho hermanos.

 

Pero no obstante crecer en “un ambiente muy holístico”, las gemelas se prepararon para enfrentar el nuevo reto. Silvia se inscribió en un programa de certificación en la New School of Massage en Wells Street, en Chicago. Martha estudió para convertirse en una estilista en Skokie en la Skincare Spa School. Para ganar dinero extra, trabajaron para poder adquirir el spa que sentó la base de Azul.

 

Primero trabajó una para apoyar a la otra en los estudios, y luego intercambiaron los papeles, y así las dos pudieron estudiar y a aportar a lo que sería su sueño, abrir un negocio propio.

 

“Estábamos soñando y teníamos todo un plan para abrir nuestro spa en dos años. En diciembre de 2011, el anterior propietario ofrece la oportunidad de comprar su spa y hacer nuestro sueño realidad. “No sabíamos que lo compraríamos más pronto de lo planeado”, dijo Silvia de Azul que en Latín, significa “salud” o “relajación en el agua”.

 

La vida también la recomenzó con una experiencia que luego le serviría en su afán de convertirse en empresarias. Las Romero han sido viajeras asiduas de ciudades famosas por sus spas, han visitado Cancún, México, la ciudad de Bath, en Inglaterra, la ciudad de Spa, en Bélgica, y el famoso Spa Gellért en Budapest.

 

“Cuando analizamos nuestra vida, es increíble que hayamos visitado todos esos lugares sin saber que algún día abriríamos un spa”, dijo Silvia.

 

Spa Holistic Azul dispone seis salas de tratamiento, que incluyen: una suite para parejas, una sala de cuidado de la piel, y una sala de meditación, donde los huéspedes comienzan el proceso de relajación antes de su tratamiento. El spa cuenta con habitaciones para hombres y mujeres, vestidores equipados con duchas y regaderas tipo lluvia, batas tipo Terry en piqué, pantuflas o zapatillas cómodas, artículos aromáticos y terapéuticos.

 

Brian Ortiz: Don’t be afraid to pursue clients

By Clemente Nicado

Q. How did you start your company, Trinidad Construction?

A. I grew up around the construction business. My grandfather owned a small construction company, on the southeast side of the city of -Chicago-, that repaired dry cleaning facilities. My father owned a construction company, Ortiz Mechanical Contractors, and I worked for him for the first ten years of my career. Then I started the Trinidad Construction Company in 2010.

Q. Wow! Not so long ago! Three years!

A. Yes, we are still a new business.

Q. What is the main thing that your company does?

A. I knew when I launched this business, my background being in construction, that I wanted to start a construction company that worked primarily in the private sector, which was something that would be somewhat different from what I had been doing. A lot of Hispanic and minority-owned businesses tend to gravitate to the public sector because of the programs that are out there, but for me personally, I wanted to get into the general contracting business because that was the easiest way for me to meet face-to-face with customers. My background had been as a mechanical contractor, where typically you are a subcontractor to a general contractor. But as a general contractor, I knew that would give me a chance to be face-to-face with clients and, ultimately, the private sector clients.

Q. How has it benefited your company to be a minority?

A. Like I mentioned, I think that a lot of minority-owned businesses are not aware of the opportunities that are out there for them in the private sector. A lot of companies now have Supplier Diversity programs in place, but a lot of them are not executing them and do not have a full understanding of how to go out and aggressively seek minority business. Walgreens has a very strong program. Rona [Fourte] has been leading that program, actively seeking minority-owned businesses to create opportunities for them, to introduce themselves. Really, the thing to understand is that these opportunities are not really set-aside programs; rather, they are programs in place to create opportunities for the businesses to get in front of large corporations that they typically could not get in front of.

Q. How many stores have you worked on for Walgreens?

A. Right now we have done major renovations of three complete stores. We are scheduled to do four more. We have done minor work in a number of other facilities: maintenance work, small construction projects, that sort of thing.

Q. So the certification has been key for the company?

A. The certification has been very important. You know, that is part of what Walgreens contracts, a certified business. Is that what you mean by minority certification? Walgreens has an aggressive diversity program in place, and they are trying to reach the “Billion Dollar Roundtable” …

Rona Fourte, director of supplier diversity for Walgreens concurred, “Absolutely!”

…so the certification created the opportunity. Rona and I had known each other prior to her working for Walgreens; we met at an event sponsored by the Chicago Minority Supplier Development Council. The reason I was there is that my company is certified through that organization. Later we got together, and she set up a meeting for us with Walgreens corporate staff. Without that certification, and without our being involved with that organization, I wouldn’t have had the chance to run across Rona and have that meeting. So certification, in that sense, has been a huge factor.

Q. Where do you see your company in five to ten years?

A. We are going to continue to grow in the markets that we work in. Walgreens provided an opportunity for us to get into the retail industry. That sort of legitimized us in the retail market. After that, we were able to get a meeting with Macy’s, and now we are doing a lot of work for Macy’s. We are doing a large project now for Macy’s on State Street in Chicago. We are also doing work in the food and beverage industry for Kraft Foods. We are doing work in the pharmaceutical industry for a couple of large pharmaceutical companies, and we are doing a lot of industrial work. My goal for five or ten years from now is to be working for the clients I am working for now, and additional clients similar to these. My goal is not to be the biggest company. Growing up in the construction industry, the expression that I learned was, “Volume is Vanity; and Profit is Prosperity.”

So we are trying to focus on strong accounts where we can make a fair profit and build on those relationships.

Q. So the economy is not a problem right now?

A. Well, we are trying to pick markets. Everything is affected by the economy. Healthcare is a market that we work in, and healthcare is a market that is not going away. We work in the food and beverage industry; people are always going to need to eat. We are trying to be diversified. We work in the pharmaceutical industry, and people are always going to need medicines. We try to be in markets that will be there through the highs and lows of the economy.

Q. What is your advice for Hispanic businesses?

A. I would tell them not to be afraid to pursue clients that they don’t think they can get. Let me clarify that. Understand that there are opportunities for Hispanic-owned businesses in the private sector. Don’t be afraid to pursue clients, and be creative in the way you build your business. Look for additional resources so that when you approach those big clients you have something that is attractive to them and you can offer something that is an added value to their businesses.

“Supplier Diversity is a business imperative for Walgreens and as we effectively partner with diverse-owned businesses, we are better positioned to present customers with the best experience and products aligned to our mission to help people get, stay and live well.”

Rona Fourté, CFE, Director, Supplier Diversity, Walgreen Co.